Castle Menzies in Scotland is the ancestral seat of the Clan Menzies and the Menzies Baronets for over 500 years. Strategically situated, the sixteenth-century castle was involved in the turbulent history of the highlands.

In 1840 an entirely new wing was added, designed by William Burn using stone from the same quarry on south side of Loch Tay.

Duleep Singh, last maharajah of the Sikh Empire, lived at Castle Menzies between 1855 and 1858, following his exile from the Punjab in 1854. He was officially the ward of Sir John Spencer Login and Lady Login, who leased the castle for him.

The castle, restored by the Menzies Clan Society after 1957, is an example of architectural transition between an earlier tradition of rugged fortresses and a later one of lightly defensible châteaux. The walls are of random rubble, originally harled (roughcast), but the quoins, turrets and door and window surrounds are of finely carved blue freestone. This attractive and extremely hard-weathering stone was also used for the architectural details and monuments at the nearby Old Kirk of Weem, which was built by the Menzies family and contains their monuments and funeral hatchments.

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Details

Founded: 16th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in United Kingdom

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

B Luffman (46 days ago)
Loved it. Its spartan aspect showed how it really was and also what a brilliant job of renovation since 1957. All the staff were genuinely enthusiastic. Nice tea room and cakes. Well worthwhile visit.
Carolyne Woodgate (50 days ago)
It was good value for money. Plenty to see. Lots of information and we also saw the mausoleum at Week where the Chiefs of the Menzies Clan were buried. A lovely tea room too.
Debbie Maclaughlan (2 months ago)
Lovely castle
Gaynor Randlesome (2 months ago)
An interesting castle to visit would have been good to see it on sunny day. Met by a gentleman who gave us a great welcome and excellent information. Felt that the video was interesting to watch but would not encourage me to buy the full version. Tea room assistant didn't seem to want to be there. Drinks were good but cakes not so reasonable price.
Gillian (3 months ago)
Very traditional and can take you right back to what it must have been like many years ago
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