Castle Menzies in Scotland is the ancestral seat of the Clan Menzies and the Menzies Baronets for over 500 years. Strategically situated, the sixteenth-century castle was involved in the turbulent history of the highlands.

In 1840 an entirely new wing was added, designed by William Burn using stone from the same quarry on south side of Loch Tay.

Duleep Singh, last maharajah of the Sikh Empire, lived at Castle Menzies between 1855 and 1858, following his exile from the Punjab in 1854. He was officially the ward of Sir John Spencer Login and Lady Login, who leased the castle for him.

The castle, restored by the Menzies Clan Society after 1957, is an example of architectural transition between an earlier tradition of rugged fortresses and a later one of lightly defensible châteaux. The walls are of random rubble, originally harled (roughcast), but the quoins, turrets and door and window surrounds are of finely carved blue freestone. This attractive and extremely hard-weathering stone was also used for the architectural details and monuments at the nearby Old Kirk of Weem, which was built by the Menzies family and contains their monuments and funeral hatchments.

References:

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: 16th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in United Kingdom

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

B Luffman (12 months ago)
Loved it. Its spartan aspect showed how it really was and also what a brilliant job of renovation since 1957. All the staff were genuinely enthusiastic. Nice tea room and cakes. Well worthwhile visit.
Carolyne Woodgate (12 months ago)
It was good value for money. Plenty to see. Lots of information and we also saw the mausoleum at Week where the Chiefs of the Menzies Clan were buried. A lovely tea room too.
Debbie Maclaughlan (13 months ago)
Lovely castle
Gaynor Randlesome (13 months ago)
An interesting castle to visit would have been good to see it on sunny day. Met by a gentleman who gave us a great welcome and excellent information. Felt that the video was interesting to watch but would not encourage me to buy the full version. Tea room assistant didn't seem to want to be there. Drinks were good but cakes not so reasonable price.
Gillian (14 months ago)
Very traditional and can take you right back to what it must have been like many years ago
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Roman Walls of Lugo

Roman Walls of Lugo are an exceptional architectural, archaeological and constructive legacy of Roman engineering, dating from the 3rd and 4th centuries AD. The Walls are built of internal and external stone facings of slate with some granite, with a core filling of a conglomerate of slate slabs and worked stone pieces from Roman buildings, interlocked with lime mortar.

Their total length of 2117 m in the shape of an oblong rectangle occupies an area of 1.68 ha. Their height varies between 8 and 10 m, with a width of 4.2 m, reaching 7 m in some specific points. The walls still contain 85 external towers, 10 gates (five of which are original and five that were opened in modern times), four staircases and two ramps providing access to the walkway along the top of the walls, one of which is internal and the other external. Each tower contained access stairs leading from the intervallum to the wall walk of town wall, of which a total of 21 have been discovered to date.

The defences of Lugo are the most complete and best preserved example of Roman military architecture in the Western Roman Empire.

Despite the renovation work carried out, the walls conserve their original layout and the construction features associated with their defensive purpose, with walls, battlements, towers, fortifications, both modern and original gates and stairways, and a moat.

Since they were built, the walls have defined the layout and growth of the city, which was declared a Historical-Artistic Ensemble in 1973, forming a part of it and becoming an emblematic structure that can be freely accessed to walk along. The local inhabitants and visitors alike have used them as an area for enjoyment and as a part of urban life for centuries.

The fortifications were added to UNESCO"s World Heritage List in late 2000 and are a popular tourist attraction.