St John's Kirk is architecturally and historically one of the most significant buildings in Perth. The settlement of the original church dates back to the mid-12th century. During the middle of the 12th century, the church was allowed to fall into disrepair, when most of the revenues were used by David I to fund Dunfermline Abbey. The majority of the present church was constructed between 1440 and 1500.

Though much altered, its tower and lead-clad spire continue to dominate the Perth skyline. The Church has lost its medieval south porch and sacristy, and the north transept was shortened during the course of the 19th century during street-widening. A rare treasure, a unique survival in Scotland, is a 15th-century brass candelabrum, imported from the Low Countries. The survival of this object is all the more remarkable as it includes a statuette of the Virgin Mary. St John's Kirk also had the finest collection of post-Reformation church plate in Scotland (now housed permanently in Perth Museum and Art Gallery). Equally remarkably, the collection of medieval bells is the largest to have survived in Great Britain.

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Founded: 12th century
Category: Religious sites in United Kingdom

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4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Lockhart Gibson Wilson (34 days ago)
Eight hundred years of history. Impressive interior with 20th century changes by Robert Lorimer. Several artworks and impressive stained glass. Sunday morning service at 9.30am.
Catherine Osborne (8 months ago)
It was lovely to see all the the restoration last time we wer there was April 2011 they wer working on the pillar the apprentice made so great to see it all in its glory.wecwer sorry to hear William the cat has gone over the rainbow bridge he was beautiful.and will be missed. It was an amazing day and the staff are all really friendly thank yous all for a great time
joyce petrie (2 years ago)
Warm welcome! Excellent service!
joyce petrie (2 years ago)
Warm welcome! Excellent service!
tartan toker (2 years ago)
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