Bonnington House is a 19th-century country house near Wilkieston. The house was built in 1622, and was the home of the Foulis Baronets of Colinton. Sir James Foulis, 2nd Baronet, served as Lord Justice Clerk from 1684 to 1688, taking the title Lord Colinton. Bonnington later passed to the Wilkies of Ormiston.

The house passed from the Scott family to Hugh Cunningham, Lord Provost of Edinburgh around 1702. It is said to have been doubled in size c.1720. In 1720 the house was owned by Hugh's son, Alexander Cunningham.

In 1858 the house was completely remodelled in a Jacobean style. The house and its 100-acre (40 ha) estate was bought by the present owners in 1999, and in 2001 the house was refurbished by Lee Boyd Architects. Two new wings were designed by Benjamin Tindall Architects, granted planning consent in 2010 and completed in 2015. The grounds of the house have been developed as a sculpture park, now open to the public as Jupiter Artland.

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Wilkieston, United Kingdom
See all sites in Wilkieston

Details

Founded: 1622
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in United Kingdom

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Charly Westcott (13 months ago)
A truly unique experience, very well priced and full of charming sculptures. Highlights were the mounds and the obsidian/amyethest pit. A great day out for friends and families.
Charly Bun (13 months ago)
A truly unique experience, very well priced and full of charming sculptures. Highlights were the mounds and the obsidian/amyethest pit. A great day out for friends and families.
Oakwood Welsh (13 months ago)
Visited Jupiter Art Land (Bonnington House) just as a treat after lockdown. Great area to walk around at gentle pace. No real inclines. Potentially muddy in areas depending on recent rainfall. Exhibitions and sculptures are interesting to bizarre. With particular favourites being Weeping Girl, Over Here and Cells of Life garden. Certainly worth a visit - even as a quiet walk thru woodland area. Just look out for artwork in-between. Cafe served good range of food and beverages at good prices.
Oakwood Welsh (13 months ago)
Visited Jupiter Art Land (Bonnington House) just as a treat after lockdown. Great area to walk around at gentle pace. No real inclines. Potentially muddy in areas depending on recent rainfall. Exhibitions and sculptures are interesting to bizarre. With particular favourites being Weeping Girl, Over Here and Cells of Life garden. Certainly worth a visit - even as a quiet walk thru woodland area. Just look out for artwork in-between. Cafe served good range of food and beverages at good prices.
Margaret Carlyle (14 months ago)
Lovely to be back here for another visit this Summer. Good to just kick back, enjoy the grounds, take in the exhibits, & generally slow down.Nice cuppa in the garden at the back of the cafe,felt CV19 safe. Great staff as always, a smile for all. Brought my friend with me today, her first visit, she was suitably impressed. So thanks again for a great experience. Hope to see u again in 2021 as I dont suppose anything events will be happening during the winter months & Xmas. Stay safe all of you.
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