Dalmeny House is a Gothic revival mansion located in an estate close to Dalmeny on the Firth of Forth. It was designed by William Wilkins, and completed in 1817. Dalmeny House is the home of the Earl and Countess of Rosebery. The house was the first in Scotland to be built in the Tudor Revival style. It provided more comfortable accommodation than the former ancestral residence, Barnbougle Castle, which still stands close by. Dalmeny today remains a private house, although it is open to the public during the summer months.

In contrast to the exterior, most of the principal rooms are in the Regency style, with the exception of the hammerbeam roof of the hall. The house contains many paintings and items of furniture from both the Rosebery and Rothschild collections, as a result of the 5th Earl's 1878 marriage to Hannah, daughter and heir of Meyer de Rothschild. Much of the French furniture and porcelain came from the family's English mansion, Mentmore, Buckinghamshire, following the latter's sale in 1977. Dalmeny also holds one of Britain's largest collections of Napoleonic memorabilia.

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Dalmeny, United Kingdom
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Founded: 1817
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in United Kingdom

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en.wikipedia.org

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4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Derek Meehan (2 months ago)
Nice grounds to walk or cycle in some good views to be seen
Ilaria Braina (5 months ago)
This place is magic,so peaceful... Its beauty stunning
Mike Elliott (5 months ago)
We parked up under the bridges at South Queensferry and wandered the estate. It's beautiful, well maintained and has some amazing stretches to walk down along the coastline. The WWII watch towers looking out over the firth or forth are a real blast from the past. If you're walking the estate, bring comfortable footwear as it is easily 6/7 mile wander.
Ian Taylor (7 months ago)
Exelant fir a nice stroll with lovely woods & beach areas alone with a wonderful estate Manor house
Robert Fleeting (7 months ago)
Great walk,gets busier with cyclists in the afternoon
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