Dalmeny House

Dalmeny, United Kingdom

Dalmeny House is a Gothic revival mansion located in an estate close to Dalmeny on the Firth of Forth. It was designed by William Wilkins, and completed in 1817. Dalmeny House is the home of the Earl and Countess of Rosebery. The house was the first in Scotland to be built in the Tudor Revival style. It provided more comfortable accommodation than the former ancestral residence, Barnbougle Castle, which still stands close by. Dalmeny today remains a private house, although it is open to the public during the summer months.

In contrast to the exterior, most of the principal rooms are in the Regency style, with the exception of the hammerbeam roof of the hall. The house contains many paintings and items of furniture from both the Rosebery and Rothschild collections, as a result of the 5th Earl's 1878 marriage to Hannah, daughter and heir of Meyer de Rothschild. Much of the French furniture and porcelain came from the family's English mansion, Mentmore, Buckinghamshire, following the latter's sale in 1977. Dalmeny also holds one of Britain's largest collections of Napoleonic memorabilia.

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Dalmeny, United Kingdom
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Founded: 1817
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in United Kingdom

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jakub Osmulski (3 years ago)
Nice area for long walk with family or group. Nice and quiet.
Tim Toghill (3 years ago)
Beautiful restful walks around green parkland with views of the Firth of Forth
Motorhomingmadness (3 years ago)
Miles of beach with lots of birdlife. Naturist opportunities if youre discrete.
Stephen Fisher (3 years ago)
Very nice walk Especially if it's a nice day
Brian Henderson (3 years ago)
Big hoose with a nice gairden.
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