Hawthornden Castle comprises a 15th-century ruin, with a 17th-century L-plan house attached. The house has been restored and now serves as a writer's retreat. Man-made caves in the rock beneath the castle have been in use for much longer than the castle itself.

The castle comprises a roughly triangular courtyard, approximately 24m long and 12m at its widest point, projecting north-west along a rocky promontory on the south bank of the River Esk. The 15th-century tower is situated at the south-east corner. Around 8m square, the tower is ruined, although the recent renovation included the installation of a library in the tower basement. There is also a rib-vaulted pit prison beneath the tower. Windows on the south curtain wall show that a range of buildings once stood here, although these are now all gone. A well in the west end of the courtyard supplied the castle's water.

The 16th century range is to the north, and is linked to the tower by a 16th-century wall, in which is the entrance. The range is of three storeys and an attic, and was originally harled. The renaissance-style doorway is of later date, as is the iron knocker with the initials of Sir William Drummond (the son of the poet) and his wife, Dame Barbara Scott. There are three gunports around the doorway, with a fourth in the tower. The last addition to the castle was a single-storey range to the west, built in the late 18th or early 19th century.

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Founded: 16th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in United Kingdom

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en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Zoltán Kerékgyártó (2 years ago)
Mysterious.......500 years old castle ruins are there..
History Enthusiast חזיר מעופף (3 years ago)
The other side of the castle. Summer acces through river esk via Roslin , caves and portal look like entry / exit, close from inside ¿ photo 20 & photo 3 stairs to Valhalla 100 feet drop to the river north esk
History Enthusiast (3 years ago)
The other side of the castle. Summer acces through river esk via Roslin , caves and portal look like entry / exit, close from inside ¿ photo 20 & photo 3 stairs to Valhalla 100 feet drop to the river north esk
Exploring #Scotland (3 years ago)
The other side of the castle. Summer acces through river esk via Roslin , caves and portal look like entry / exit, close from inside ¿ photo 20 & photo 3 stairs to Valhalla 100 feet drop to the river north esk
James Livingstone (3 years ago)
Fantastic views all around, cant wait to get back on a sun filled day ! Great location
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