Château de la Verrerie

Oizon, France

The fine early Renaissance château is located on the edge of the Forêt d’Ivoy. The land was given to the Scot Sir John Stuart by Charles VII, in thanks for defeating the English at the battle of Baugé in 1421. However, the château was not built until the end of the 15th century, at which time Béraud Stuart, the grandson of John Stuart, returning from a campaign in Italy, constructed the main house to the side of the Chapel, that joined onto the Renaissance Gallery, which was built in 1525 by Robert Stuart, the son-in-law of Béraud Stuart and a comrade-in-arms of Bayard.

In 1670, the last Stuart of Aubigny died and the Château de La Verrerie, as laid down in King Charles VII deed of donation, was returned to the French crown. King Louis XIV, acting on a decree of 18 March 1673, gave the land back to Charles II, King of England, who was the direct male descendant of John Stuart. In the same year, at his request, it was given as a gift to his mistress, Louise de Kérouaille, Duchess of Portsmouth.

La Verrerie has a lovely Renaissance gallery with 16th century frescoes. There are also frescoes in the chapel, dating from the same period.

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Address

La Verrerie, Oizon, France
See all sites in Oizon

Details

Founded: ca. 1500
Category: Castles and fortifications in France

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Patrice Le Fur (3 months ago)
Un lieu découvert par hasard. Mais le hasard fait bien les choses. Nous eu la chance de profiter d'une visite hors période d'ouverture grâce à un groupe qui avait réservé. Nous avons eu droit à une visite commentée par le châtelain, amoureux de son château et de son histoire. Une visite très enrichissante ou la petite histoire côtoie souvent la grande. Il faut vraiment faire le détour pour profiter et de la visite et du cadre extérieur. Un château d'agrément au bord de son étang
Gérard Coustes (3 months ago)
A la lisière d'une forêt au bord d'un étang cet imposant édifice on entre dans cet hôtel par une porte à tourelles style renaissance un bel hôtel cinq chambres d'hôtes de grandes classes le petit déjeuner est gratuit compris car le prix est assez élevé
Benjamin Faes (2 years ago)
Stunning renaissance castle
Takeo K. (2 years ago)
So nice!! Beautiful garden, delicious cuisine:)
daniele borghi (3 years ago)
Excellent and unique location. Very expensive but it has to be seen at last once
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