The Berry Museum

Bourges, France

The Hôtel Cujas, which is a listed historical monument, has housed the Berry Museum since 1892.

The ground floor is occupied by the archaeological collections, with protohistoric (locally-found bronze Etruscan artefacts) and especially Gallo-Roman finds. Bourges-Avaricum was the capital of the ancient province of Aquitaine.

The lapidary section includes a large number of funeral items (220 steles), as well as fragments of religious architecture and sculptures.

Sculptures from the Holy Chapel of Bourges, mourners from the tomb of Duke John of Berry, as well as stained glass windows and precious objects are exhibited in another aisle of the museum.

Paintings and drawings by Jean Boucher, a particularly active artist in Bourges during the first third part of the 17th century, can also be seen in the same aisle.

On the first floor, rural life in Berry in the 19th century is brought to life through everyday items, furniture, costumes, tools used by farmers and craftsmen. A room is devoted to the works of the famous 19th century potters from the village of La Borne : the Talbot family.

Finally, another small room exhibits Egyptian funeral objects, including a mummy in its sarcophagus.

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Founded: 1892
Category: Museums in France

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