Jacques Coeur Palace

Bourges, France

Born in Bourges some time around the year 1400, Jacques Coeur rapidly rose to the top of the social ladder. After his appointment as Finance Minister to the King and being made a nobleman, he began the construction of his Palace, which was finished around 1450.

This monument was unique in France for its time but illustrates well the original personality of its builder. It is a precursor of the mansions of the Renaissance period: the large main building is constructed against the Gallo-Roman wall. The galleries running around the courtyard link it to the chapel over the main doorway.

Great care was taken to make the Palace both comfortable and hygienic (washrooms, latrines). The reception rooms and private apartments have richly decorated fireplaces. The different parts of the building are linked by a particularly practical system of spiral staircases, passages and galleries.

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Details

Founded: ca. 1450
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in France

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ulrike Guerin (2 months ago)
Very beautiful palace.
Adeel Qurashi (4 months ago)
Beautiful architecture and surroundings. Must visit if you are in town.
Richard Scott (5 months ago)
Fabulous place tucked away up a side street.
Jean-Baptiste Simeon (6 months ago)
Nice place but there is a clear lack of furniture in the rooms of the palace... You cannot really project yourself in what life was like at the time.
Shaun Kitson (7 months ago)
Wonderful architecture and fascinating history. Enjoyed the music and light projection in the evening.
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