Built during the 13th-15th centuries, the castle of San Vicente de Argueso represents the most outstanding and ancient example of the Roqueno Castle of Cantabria, being the only interior castle that exists in the Community.

The castle was one of the strengths of Senorio de la Vega from which they defended their interests in Campoo de Suso. In the fifteenth century, he is the owner of the same Don Leonor de la Vega, wife of the Admiral of Castile, Don Diego Hurtado de Mendoza and mother of Inigo Lopez de Mendoza, the illustrious Marques de Santillana, one of the key players in the Castilian politics of that era. He is more known perhaps for the quality of his poetic work. On the death of the Marquis, in 1458, his first born son, Diego Hurtado de Mendoza, succeeded him, and thanks to the fidelity shown to the Catholic Monarchs, he was appointed in 1475 Duke of the Infantado, Marques de Argueso and Campoo. From then on, the castle became the seat of the Marquesado de Argueso, which was organized under an administration that was independent in some respects from that of the Merindad de Campo. Don Mariano Tellez Giron, Duke of Osuna and the last Marques owner of the castle, sold the castle in 1873. Ever since then passing through different hands. The last owner of the castle, Dona Teresa Rabago, donated the castle to the City Council of the Brotherhood of Campoo de Suso in 1962 with the 'only' condition is that the castle would be renovated. They are still the owners of the fortress until this day.

Declared a Cultural Interest Property in 1983, the castle was restored by the Town Council of the Brotherhood of Campoo de Suso and the Regional Government.

On the occasion of this restoration in 1988, highlighting the great artisanal work done on the noble wood by the Sobaler family and their team of local craftsmen (artisans). They found in the basement of the south tower and the walls of the old chapel of the martyr San Vicente, around which a necropolis was still visible in the courtyard of the castle.

In August of 1999, the Castle opened its doors to the public, functioning as a cultural centre, hosting both temporary exhibitions, as well as other festivities.

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Founded: 13th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Spain

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Franck Olives (15 months ago)
I recommend going up to that medieval castle. They do exhibitions, concerts and weddings. It is completely renovated and very well preserved. Inside is wood, beams and floors of the plants. Along the way, you can find storks, horses and cows. In wild nature.
Raquel MC (15 months ago)
It's worth the stop, the whole castle was nicely renovated by a local carpenter during 10 year. Its a masterpiece, amazing woodcraftship. Besides seeing the castle one can enjoy the art exhibitions held inside. "Special mention deserves the great artisan work carried out during its reconstruction; This work, carried out on noble wood (chestnut and native oak) and in charge of the Sobaler family and their team of local artisans, is cause for admiration" wikipedia
Bea Gomez (20 months ago)
Go back to other times. Very well restored. Beautiful woodwork. Environment.
Norteño Gourmet (21 months ago)
Always beautiful and original, a very good initiative for the area when it was restored years ago and you can visit and give a little life to this small town.
Franky. Fer. (2 years ago)
Ok
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