Medieval castles in Cantabria

Santa Ana Castle

Santa Ana Castle was built in the 13th century but abandoned already in the 16th century. The five 15m high corner towers protect the main building where the lighthouse was erected in 1853.
Founded: 13th century | Location: Castro Urdiales, Spain

San Vicente de la Barquera Castle

The castle of San Vicente de la Barquera was a royal residence built by Alfonso I of Asturias in the 8th century. The current walls and structure date from the 13th century. The complex is 50 meters long and around 20 m wide. Today the restored castle is a museum and used for events.
Founded: 13th century | Location: San Vicente de la Barquera, Spain

Argüeso Castle

Built during the 13th-15th centuries, the castle of San Vicente de Argueso represents the most outstanding and ancient example of the Roqueno Castle of Cantabria, being the only interior castle that exists in the Community. The castle was one of the strengths of Senorio de la Vega from which they defended their interests in Campoo de Suso. In the fifteenth century, he is the owner of the same Don Leonor de la Vega, wife ...
Founded: 13th century | Location: Hermandad de Campoo de Suso, Spain

Torre de Venero

Torre de Venero is a late medieval fortified tower built in the 13-14th centuries by Martín Sánchez del Castillo. The square tower is around 10m high and has four floors.
Founded: 13th century | Location: Cantabria, Spain

Torre de Cabrahigo

Cabrahigo was probably built in the 15th century by Velarde family. The square tower has four floors and is 12m high.
Founded: 15th century | Location: Arnuero, Spain

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Caerleon Roman Amphitheatre

Built around AD 90 to entertain the legionaries stationed at the fort of Caerleon (Isca), the impressive amphitheatre was the Roman equivalent of today’s multiplex cinema. Wooden benches provided seating for up to 6,000 spectators, who would gather to watch bloodthirsty displays featuring gladiatorial combat and exotic wild animals.

Long after the Romans left, the amphitheatre took on a new life in Arthurian legend. Geoffrey of Monmouth, the somewhat imaginative 12th-century scholar, wrote in his History of the Kings of Britain that Arthur was crowned in Caerleon and that the ruined amphitheatre was actually the remains of King Arthur’s Round Table.

Today it is the most complete Roman amphitheatre in Britain.