Plaošnik is an archaeological site and holy place in Ohrid. The church was built by St. Clement in the year 893 on the foundation of an early Christian basilica, and dedicated to St. Panteleimon. It was here that the Ohrid Literary School, a center of Slavonic literary and cultural activity where more than 3,500 disciples were educated. St. Clement was buried in this church, in the tomb which was built by his own hands.

After the advent of the Ottoman Empire, St. Clement's church was converted into a mosque, known as the Imaret Mosque, of which only a small enclosure remains. The mosque was built as an endowment and a memorial by Sinan Chelebi, member of the distinguished Turkish family of the Ohrizade. The Imaret Mosque was torn down in 2000 with the reason given that it was constructed over the remains of a church in the Plaošnik area and the former mosque was added to the damaged religious buildings list compiled by the Islamic Religious Community of Macedonia.

Apart from the church's many reconstructions during the time of the Ottoman Empire, it has undergone extensive reconstruction and excavation in the contemporary period.

On Plaošnik has been discovered the baptistery of the five aisle basilica with hooked crosses (swastikas) on the mosaic floors which date from the period between 4th and 6th century. It is assumed that this early Christian basilica at Plaoshnik upon which the Kliment's monastery was built in the 9th century, was dedicated to St. Paul the Apostle who preached Christianity in Lychnidos (present-day Ohrid) in the 1st century A.D.

On 10 October 2007, a deposit of approximately 2,383 Venetian coins was discovered by archaeologists while excavating the monastery.

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Founded: 4th century AD
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in North Macedonia

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4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jakub Jílek (15 months ago)
The archeological site is not open to public so you will not get anything from what might have been found there.
Bobi Beatbox (2 years ago)
So beautiful, stop the new construction.
Александар Кочовски (2 years ago)
Old archeological site, absolutely destroyed by construction of huge faux-byzantine buildings. An archeological and architectural travesty.
Zoran Cekov (2 years ago)
The best view from Ohrid lake
Konstantin Alarov (2 years ago)
Beautifull spiritual place with a great lake view. Impressive
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