Llanthony Priory s a partly ruined former Augustinian priory. The priory dates back to around the year 1100, when Norman nobleman Walter de Lacy reputedly came upon a ruined chapel of St. David in this location, and was inspired to devote himself to solitary prayer and study. A church was built on the site, dedicated to St John the Baptist, and consecrated in 1108. By 1118, a group of around 40 monks from England founded there a priory of Canons Regular, the first in Wales.

In 1135, after persistent attacks from the local Welsh population, the monks retreated to Gloucester where they founded a secondary cell, Llanthony Secunda. However, around 1186 another member of the de Lacy family, Hugh, the fifth baron, endowed the estate with funds from his Irish estates to rebuild the priory church, and this work was completed by 1217.

The Priory became one of the great medieval buildings in Wales, in a mixture of Norman and Gothic architectural styles. Renewed building took place around 1325, with a new gatehouse.

Following Owain Glyndŵr's rebellion in the early 15th century, the Priory seems to have been barely functioning. In 1481 it was formally merged with its daughter cell in Gloucester, and after 1538 both houses were suppressed by Henry VIII's Dissolution of the Monasteries.

The buildings at Llanthony gradually decayed after the Dissolution to a ruin, although in the early 18th century the medieval infirmary was converted to the Church of St David. In 1799 the estate was bought by Colonel Sir Mark Wood, the owner of Piercefield House near Chepstow, who converted some of the buildings into a domestic house and shooting box.

The ruins have attracted artists over the years, including J. M. W. Turner who painted them from the opposite hillside. Wood's house later became the Abbey Hotel. The remaining ruins are protected by Cadw and entrance to the ruins is free.

References:

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: 1118
Category: Religious sites in United Kingdom

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ceri Owen-Roberts (16 months ago)
Kids loved running around playing hide and seek. Cellar bar has a great selection
Ed Hodge (17 months ago)
Beautiful place. You can really feel the history. Best to arrive by foot as the road in is long and windy. We unfortunately weren't staying but would love to some time.
maroo (17 months ago)
** Review for restaurant ** Came here for dinner, food was nice and good price. Got a pint from the bar and you can drink them sitting on the grass within the Priory which is lovely. Great selection of beers/drinks. Also had a small shop on the bar which sold crisps/snacks/postcards.
Chris Harris (18 months ago)
Stopped off to have a look at the Priory ruins and decided to have a sandwich and drinks once we were there. Really friendly staff, felt properly welcome, food served promptly and good standard, with a good selection of local beers. Great location for starting/ending a walk too.
Richard Naylor (18 months ago)
Lovely location. Unusual as it has a cafe/bar attached to the ruins. Lovely place to sit and sup your beer/wine in the sun.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Caerleon Roman Amphitheatre

Built around AD 90 to entertain the legionaries stationed at the fort of Caerleon (Isca), the impressive amphitheatre was the Roman equivalent of today’s multiplex cinema. Wooden benches provided seating for up to 6,000 spectators, who would gather to watch bloodthirsty displays featuring gladiatorial combat and exotic wild animals.

Long after the Romans left, the amphitheatre took on a new life in Arthurian legend. Geoffrey of Monmouth, the somewhat imaginative 12th-century scholar, wrote in his History of the Kings of Britain that Arthur was crowned in Caerleon and that the ruined amphitheatre was actually the remains of King Arthur’s Round Table.

Today it is the most complete Roman amphitheatre in Britain.