New York Stock Exchange Building

New York, United States

The New York Stock Exchange Building (NYSE Building) is a structure in the Financial District of Manhattan, serving as the headquarters of the New York Stock Exchange. It is composed of two connected structures occupying two-thirds of the city block bounded by Wall Street, Broad Street, New Street, and Exchange Place. The central third of the block contains the original structure at 18 Broad Street, designed in the neoclassical style by George B. Post. The northern third contains a 23-story office annex at 11 Wall Street, designed by Trowbridge & Livingston in a similar style.

The marble facade of 18 Broad Street contains colonnades facing east toward Broad Street and west toward New Street, both atop two-story podiums. The Broad Street colonnade, an icon of the NYSE, contains a pediment designed by John Quincy Adams Ward, depicting commerce and industry. Behind the colonnades at 18 Broad Street is the main trading floor, a 22 m rectangular space.

The NYSE had occupied the site on Broad Street since 1865 but had to expand its previous building several times because of overcrowding. The structure at 18 Broad Street was erected between 1901 and 1903, replacing the previous building. Within two decades, the NYSE's new building had become overcrowded, and the annex at 11 Wall Street was added between 1920 and 1922. Three more trading floors were added in the late 20th century to accommodate increasing demand, and there were several proposals to move the NYSE elsewhere during that time. With the growing popularity of electronic trading in the 2000s, the three newer trading floors were closed in 2007.

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Founded: 1901
Category: Miscellaneous historic sites in United States

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