Sundborn Church

Sundborn, Sweden

Sundborn Church rises beautifully beside the shore of lake Toftan. There has been a church in Sundborn since the 17th century, but the present wooden church was built in 1755 and the pulpit is from the late 19th century. Carl Larsson redecorated the whole church in 1905. Prominent places are occupied by his Altar Angels, John the baptist, wall decorations in the shape of pine twigs and an abundance of flower garlands and other paintings.

There is a popular bathing place beyond the Church, and a beautiful path along the shore. Here you can also find the Carl Larsson family grave.

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Details

Founded: 1755
Category: Religious sites in Sweden
Historical period: The Age of Liberty (Sweden)

More Information

www.sundborn.com

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Per Norling (4 years ago)
You feel the wings of history and that in an incredibly nice and beautiful place in Dalarna.
Mac Cat (4 years ago)
Old wooden church in a beautiful surrounding. Mostly open. Well worth a visit.
Maria Pia Liikanen (4 years ago)
Very nice and cozy church we were baptized in
Mia McCurdy (4 years ago)
Beautiful church and views. Explored the area on the Sundborn Kulture Walk! Fun way to spend some extra time before/after your Carl Larsson garden/home tour and learn more about the town and the artist.
Mats Edvardsson (4 years ago)
Nice little church. There is also Carl Larsson's grave.
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