Hedemora Church

Hedemora, Sweden

Hedemora Church was founded in the 12th or 13th century and is the oldest surviving building in the town. The church has a font that is believed to be as old as the church. It also possesses a crucifix that would have been used in processions before the Reformation, which is believed to date from the same period. The pulpit is a beautiful Baroque work, from the early eighteenth century, and well worth seeing.

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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Religious sites in Sweden
Historical period: Consolidation (Sweden)

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wikimapia.org

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4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Cecilia Fektenberg (2 years ago)
Fint!
Joakim von Krusenstierna (3 years ago)
Fin kyrka
Tahvo Jauhojärvi (3 years ago)
En fin kyrka.
Anders Falk (3 years ago)
Hedemora Kyrka är fin och väldigt väl bevarad då den genomgått stora renoveringar som gett den ett fint yttre igen som den förtjänar! Kyrkan har riktigt fin konst i sig och är absolut värt ett besök. Själva kyrkogården är jätte fin den med på sommaren och är riktigt mysig att gå i på sommaren med väl placerade sittplatser för att kunna vila benen.
Jan Wallander (3 years ago)
I denna kyrka var som barn med min farmor på 60 talet, kyrka har alltid haft en skön inlevelse för mej.
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