Château de Saché

Saché, France

The Château de Saché is a stately home built from the converted remains of a feudal castle. It was here, between 1830 and 1837, that the French writer Honoré de Balzac wrote some of his finest works in the series La Comédie Humaine, comprising nearly 90 novels, in which he attempted to reflect every aspect of French society at that time.

The château was owned by Balzac's friend, Jean de Margonne, his mother's lover and the father of her youngest child. The writer would often spend long periods staying here, away from his turbulent life in Paris, writing 14 to 16 hours a day. After supper he would sleep a few hours, wake around midnight and write until morning, sustained by large amounts of coffee.

Since 1951, the château has been open as an evocative museum dedicated to Balzac. His small second-floor bedroom has a simple bed and writing desk where so many of his often tormented characters were conceived.

The château was built upon the foundations of a twelfth-century fortified house, of which a cylindrical tower and dry moats remain. The building was successively transformed in the 16th through 18th centuries. It has been listed as a monument historique since June 1983 by the French Ministry of Culture.

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Details

Founded: 16th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in France

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4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

christopher poupon (3 years ago)
Great mate
Christian Mogensen (3 years ago)
Charming Balzac museum, with children's activities. Notes and descriptions in French, English and German.
kwesi marles (4 years ago)
Nice museum with lovely garden.
kwesi marles (4 years ago)
Nice museum with lovely garden.
Joana Gostautaite (4 years ago)
It is very interesting and nice place. I am glad that I've had oportunity to visit it.
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