Château de Chamerolles

Chilleurs-aux-Bois, France

The Château de Chamerolles was built in the first half of 16th century by Lancelot I, chamberlain of Louis XII and Bailiff of Orléans under King François I. His son, Lancelot II agreed to Protestantism in 1562 and housed a Protestant church in Chamerolles. The castle became a center of the Protestant religion in the region. Chamerolles was a typical castle with square form and round towers in every corner. It is completely surrounded by the moat.

In 1774 the castle became the property of Lambert family who owned it until 1924. Occupied, looted and plundered during the Second World War, Chamerolles was put on sale in 1970. In 1976 it was abandoned the castle fell into disrepair. The General Council of Loiret bought it in 1987 and after restoration Chamerolles château was opened to the public in 1992.

In Chamerolles, there are no fewer than six gardens surrounded by vines, honeysuckle and roses trained on trellises. A spice and herb garden evokes the splendid aromas of delicious culinary specialities. Further on, fruit and vegetables of a thousand colours are the centre of attention.

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Details

Founded: 16th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in France

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

ice skater (2 years ago)
Spent all afternoon at this lovely restored castle and gardens. Very interesting place. Good value.
Alison Richards (2 years ago)
Interesting and pretty little chateau, I enjoyed all the perfume history and bottles. Didn't so much enjoy the modern art statues throughout - they clashed weirdly with the lovely rooms, would have preferred them without the sculptures. Plenty of parking, nice garden
Anabela Baptista (2 years ago)
Lovely with a beautiful garden
Sebastian Guelfi (3 years ago)
Great location for a wedding. Great food excellent service in a lovely location. Beautiful.
Rade Rade (3 years ago)
Prelepo mesto kao i dvorac uostalom pogledajte slike i bice vam jasno :) Beautyfull castle and garden so look the pictures and u will see :)
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