Varberg Fortress

Varberg, Sweden

Varberg Fortress was built in 1287-1300 by count Jacob Nielsen as protection against his Danish king, who had declared him an outlaw after the murder of King Eric V of Denmark. Jacob had close connections with king Eric II of Norway and as a result got substantial Norwegian assistance with the construction. The fortress, as well as half the county, became Norwegian in 1305.

King Eric's grand daughter, Ingeborg Håkansdotter, inherited the area from her father, King Haakon V of Norway. She and her husband, Eric, Duke of Södermanland, established a semi-independent state out of their Norwegian, Swedish and Danish counties until the death of Erik. They spent considerable time at the fortress. Their son, King Magnus IV of Sweden (Magnus VII of Norway), spent much time at the fortress as well.

The fortress was augmented during the late 16th and early 17th century on order by King Christian IV of Denmark. However, after the Treaty of Brömsebro in 1645 the fortress became Swedish. It was used as a military installation until 1830 and as a prison from the end of the 17th Century until 1931.

It is currently used as a museum and bed and breakfast as well as private accommodation. The moat of the fortress is said to be inhabited by a small lake monster. In August 2006, a couple of witnesses claimed to have seen the monster emerge from the dark water and devour a duck. The creature is described as brown, hairless and with a 40 cm long tail.

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Address

Fästningen 9, Varberg, Sweden
See all sites in Varberg

Details

Founded: 1287-1300
Category: Castles and fortifications in Sweden
Historical period: Consolidation (Sweden)

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Lars Rasmusson (7 months ago)
Really nice view and the museum is interesting
Erik Behm (7 months ago)
Beautiful view of the sea and Varberg. Museum always worth to visit. We are members of the museum's supporter group.
High Places Films (8 months ago)
Wonderful fortress, well conservated with a lot of history in the museum inside! Here you can find also a very good food with nice price. You must visit!!
Magnus Karlsson (10 months ago)
Really nice fortress with a lot to see. Amoung other things they had the actual bullet made out of a button that killed King Karl XII on display. However, kids can get a bit bored a times so there is a good thing that there is a nice playground nearby.
Marije (11 months ago)
Nice and interesting castle, if you do not speak Swedish it is a little harder to understand, because most information is given in Swedish. They have a recorder in English but it is less detailed
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