Tjolöholm Castle

Fjärås, Sweden

Tjolöholm Castle is a country house built 1898-1904. It is located on a peninsula in the Kungsbacka Fjord on the Kattegat coast. Tjoloholm Castle was designed in the Arts and Crafts style by architect Lars Israel Wahlmann. In 2010, Danish film director Lars Von Trier shot the exterior scenes of the film Melancholia at the castle.

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Debra Jane Zeller said 6 years ago
It is spectacular. Worth the effort to see it.


Details

Founded: 1898-1904
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Sweden
Historical period: Union with Norway and Modernization (Sweden)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

C. Art (12 months ago)
Fantastic experience...I wouldn't name it castle but a mansion. Big beautiful Mansion.
Laimis Stanislauskas (2 years ago)
Nice old building,tidy place place around,beutiful big yard and gardens,close the sea,ideal place visiting familys,walk with kids and dogs.
Jonas Larsson (2 years ago)
I've been twice and both of the times has been really good! The first time was for a guided tour and now last weekend for the Christmas market. It was a lovely event with a great selection of products to buy and great selection in the cafe. The glögg tiramisu was the best desert I have had in years! I want it every day! The sandwiches were also great. The interior design at Tjolöholm is amazing and the vibe in the building is also really cool. I want to come back about twice a year! :)
Bonnie Hui (2 years ago)
I absolutely loved the tour of this beautiful castle and surrounding land. The guided tour is in Swedish but there are English materials. I liked learning the history and enjoyed seeing some of the Downton Abbey exhibit on display. The interior is well restored and preserved. Outside there were food trucks and a fair as it was the weekend.
Yuuka Urabe (2 years ago)
Large nature spot with beautiful small church and british-looking castle. Christmas market was very worth visiting, you can find some local products and have fika at one of their cozy cafes.
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