Dundaga Castle

Dundaga, Latvia

Dundaga Castle is a medieval castle by the Archbishopric of Riga, who gained control over the lands of Dundaga in 1237. Dundaga Castle was constructed next to a Curonian settlement (Dundagas Kalnadarzs hillfort). The exact time of construction is not known, though it is first mentioned in written sources in 1318. It is assumed that the castle was constructed in the late 13th century, and several times captured by Livonian Order.

In 1434 the castle was sold to the Bishopric of Courland, and sold again in 1559 - to the King of Denmark who in turn granted it to his brother Magnus, Duke of Holstein - future Curonian Bishop.

In the middle of the 17th century it was transformed from a medieval fortress to a representative residence of a country nobleman by Anna Sybil (born Osten-Sacken). The third floor was added in 1785. The family of Osten-Sacken were owners of the castle up to 1920.

Dundaga Castle suffered heavily in a fire in 1872 and its historical interiors were destroyed. It burned again in 1905, and was renovated beginning in 1909 after the design of H. Pfeiffer. As a result the castle was modernised and transformed. Since 1926 the castle has been used as a public building - as a local municipal administration, school, and cultural institution. The castle is the source of numerous legends, tales and ghost stories which, in many cases, are close to real historical events.

The castle is surrounded by water on three sides. The fourth side was defended by a moat in medieval times, today it is on level ground. The castle covers 48 x 69 meters, rectangular, surrounded with high defensive walls. In the inner yard a well has been preserved. The castle has been transformed in numerous renovations and does not have a specific architectural style.

Interesting monuments of art are bas reliefs at both sides of the main entrance in the inner yard - made by A. Voltz in 1909. One represents a warrior monk, the other - a bishop.

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Address

Pils iela 7, Dundaga, Latvia
See all sites in Dundaga

Details

Founded: Late 13th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Latvia
Historical period: State of the Teutonic Order (Latvia)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Alexander Yartsev (9 months ago)
It was an "majas kafeinicu dienas" event during my visit and there was a cafe inside cozy castle courtyard. Atmospheric music and authentic entourage was a nice addition to a cup of coffee and pancakes with strawberry jam
im just good (10 months ago)
Not the best but was really pretty.
Andris Aispurs (13 months ago)
I have visited it as a tourist not a guest. You cant get inside the castle. Park territory around it is nice. There is a Citro shop nearby if you want to grab something to eat or drink during or before/after visit. Bistro across the road is closed
Modris Dzelstiņš (13 months ago)
So calm and unique place. Historical art.
Elina Junolainena (13 months ago)
A secret gem! Not always available on Booking.com so don't hesitate to call directly for an overnight stay. A separate kitchen for self-service. Rooms give a royal feeling :)
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