Talsi Lutheran Church

Talsi, Latvia

On the steep Church Hill of Talsi rising above the old town stands the white-stone Church of Talsi – built in 1567 and reconstructed numerous times. In the course of several centuries its architecture was shaped by Romanesque and Gothic architectural styles. Its history is reflected both in the architectural planning and in the facade structure of the building, providing an insight into the architectural fashion of 18-19th centuries. The history is also symbolically manifested through the church relics, of which the most prominent are an epitaph of the Vischer family (1794) engraved in limestone and bearing some traits of Classicism, as well as the altar painting 'The Ascension of Christ' (1876, C. Schönherr).The church has two stained-glass windows and two bronze church-bells in the tower (the oldest dating back to 1601). Many outstanding pastors have served in the church. The most renowned was Karl Ferdinand Amenda - due to his connection with the acclaimed composer Ludwig van Beethoven.

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Details

Founded: 1567
Category: Religious sites in Latvia
Historical period: Duchy of Livonia (Latvia)

More Information

www.latvia.travel

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Juris Kucins (15 months ago)
Very old building and very well preserved.
Paulius Šopis (17 months ago)
Very cozy church, being in the town of Talsi is worth a visit!
Māris Mazkalniņš (23 months ago)
I always missed it
Dace Bunte (2 years ago)
Clean.Likes the cobblestone.
mark O'connor (2 years ago)
Got married here,lovely church and people,full of history,see if you can spot the cannon ball dent.
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