Talsi Lutheran Church

Talsi, Latvia

On the steep Church Hill of Talsi rising above the old town stands the white-stone Church of Talsi – built in 1567 and reconstructed numerous times. In the course of several centuries its architecture was shaped by Romanesque and Gothic architectural styles. Its history is reflected both in the architectural planning and in the facade structure of the building, providing an insight into the architectural fashion of 18-19th centuries. The history is also symbolically manifested through the church relics, of which the most prominent are an epitaph of the Vischer family (1794) engraved in limestone and bearing some traits of Classicism, as well as the altar painting 'The Ascension of Christ' (1876, C. Schönherr).The church has two stained-glass windows and two bronze church-bells in the tower (the oldest dating back to 1601). Many outstanding pastors have served in the church. The most renowned was Karl Ferdinand Amenda - due to his connection with the acclaimed composer Ludwig van Beethoven.

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Details

Founded: 1567
Category: Religious sites in Latvia
Historical period: Duchy of Livonia (Latvia)

More Information

www.latvia.travel

Rating

4.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Velta Snore (2 years ago)
Senà baznìca,kas dveß senatnes elpu pulcè daźàdu paaudźu ĺaudis.Dievkalpojumi ir labi apmeklèti un macìtàja sprediķi ir kà pèrles,tik vèrtìgi tie ir.Sen rakstìtà Gràmata,tik labi atbilst mùsdienàm,cik labi ataino cilvèku toreiz,senajàs dienàs pèc radìßanas.
Evija Brauča (2 years ago)
Lieliska baznīca! Ļoti pretimnākoši un ieinteresēti darbinieki.
Martins Barkovskis (2 years ago)
Ļoti skaista Baznīca, ar mīlestību atjaunota
Inta Ulmane (3 years ago)
Baznīcas tornis savā jubilejas gadā lepojas ar jauniem pulksteņiem, kuri îpašās reizēs atskaņos îpašas.melodijas.
Dzintars Photography www.dzintarskrastins.com (4 years ago)
Skaista un plaša, noteikti iesaku jaunajiem pāriem.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Kromeriz Castle and Gardens

Kroměříž stands on the site of an earlier ford across the River Morava. The gardens and castle of Kroměříž are an exceptionally complete and well-preserved example of a European Baroque princely residence and its gardens and described as a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

The first residence on the site was founded by bishop Stanislas Thurzo in 1497. The building was in a Late Gothic style, with a modicum of Renaissance detail. During the Thirty Years' War, the castle was sacked by the Swedish army (1643).

It was not until 1664 that a bishop from the powerful Liechtenstein family charged architect Filiberto Lucchese with renovating the palace in a Baroque style. The chief monument of Lucchese's work in Kroměříž is the Pleasure Garden in front of the castle. Upon Lucchese's death in 1666, Giovanni Pietro Tencalla completed his work on the formal garden and had the palace rebuilt in a style reminiscent of the Turinese school to which he belonged.

After the castle was gutted by a major fire in March 1752, Bishop Hamilton commissioned two leading imperial artists, Franz Anton Maulbertsch and Josef Stern, arrived at the residence in order to decorate the halls of the palace with their works. In addition to their paintings, the palace still houses an art collection, generally considered the second finest in the country, which includes Titian's last mythological painting, The Flaying of Marsyas. The largest part of the collection was acquired by Bishop Karel in Cologne in 1673. The palace also contains an outstanding musical archive and a library of 33,000 volumes.

UNESCO lists the palace and garden among the World Heritage Sites. As the nomination dossier explains, 'the castle is a good but not outstanding example of a type of aristocratic or princely residence that has survived widely in Europe. The Pleasure Garden, by contrast, is a very rare and largely intact example of a Baroque garden'. Apart from the formal parterres there is also a less formal nineteenth-century English garden, which sustained damage during floods in 1997.

Interiors of the palace were extensively used by Miloš Forman as a stand-in for Vienna's Hofburg Imperial Palace during filming of Amadeus (1984), based on the life of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, who actually never visited Kroměříž. The main audience chamber was also used in the film Immortal Beloved (1994), in the piano concerto scene.