Igene church is one of the few wooden churches in Latvia. It was built in 1757. The shape of the dimension, layout and proportions of the church are archaic bearing evidence of preservation of ancient traditions of wooden craft. The church was and financed by the owner of Igene Manor Alexander von den Brincken. The one-nave log building is planked with horizontally painted boards, there is a polygonal apse, sacristy and a square bell tower with a polygonal roof peak brought forward from the building.

There are several valuable items in the church: the altar (1752) and pulpit, which were not very successfully painted in 1932. During the restoration, when the top layer of the black colouring was cleaned, paintings were uncovered, which indicate that the pulpit and the altar are older than the church itself. The fitting of the door lock (18th century) and the wind-cock on the tower (1757) are peculiar.

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Address

Iģene, Talsi, Latvia
See all sites in Talsi

Details

Founded: 1757
Category: Religious sites in Latvia
Historical period: Part of the Russian Empire (Latvia)

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

ZS Cerpas (3 years ago)
The oldest wooden church in the Baltics!
Māris Lazdiņš (3 years ago)
Marika Bandeniece (3 years ago)
Sandra Jēkabsone (3 years ago)
I recommend to visit.
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