Koknese Castle Ruins

Koknese, Latvia

Before the arrival of the Teutonic Knights, Koknese was the site of a wooden hill fort inhabited by the Balts. In 1209 Bishop Albert of Riga ordered the construction of a stone castle at the site, naming it Kokenhusen. For the first 50 years of its existence, Koknese was solely used as a defensive fort, but by 1277, Koknese had enough population to receive city rights. Koknese also became a member of the Hanseatic League thanks to its strategic location on the Daugava trade route.

The castle was heavily contested between Polish, Swedish and Russian forces in the 16th and 17th centuries. It changed hands many times, while the native inhabitants endured periodic slaughter, capture, and famine. In 1701, during the Great Northern War, Koknese was finally blown up by retreating forces to avoid the strategic castle falling into advancing Russian hands. The castle was never rebuilt and fell to ruin.

In 1900, a park was established around the castle ruins, and Koknese became a popular summer resort. The area was known for its scenic waterfalls, cliffs, and look-outs. In 1965, the Soviet government built Pļaviņas Hydro Power Plant in the town of Aizkraukle. The reservoir flooded the entire length of the Daugava to Pļaviņas. Koknese Castle, once sitting atop a high bluff, was placed at the river's edge, while the scenic Daugava valley was submerged.

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Details

Founded: 1209
Category: Ruins in Latvia
Historical period: State of the Teutonic Order (Latvia)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Roxanne Jakuska (3 months ago)
Nice walk in the forest with great views
Domenico Grazioso (5 months ago)
Nice park. The lady selling the tickets spend a.lot of time with us. I was with a group of 12 boys (12 to - 16 yo) and they were super interested in what she said. The place has WC all over and super views. It is quite iconic.
Alan Glavin (5 months ago)
Was informed on latvian/laovian history
Mar Vee (7 months ago)
Very nice, peacefull, well kept treasure. Really like the atmosphere there.
Stephan Dreyer (9 months ago)
Interesting place to see, not so much historical information (not like a museum). Interesting to see the effect of the new hydropower reservoir. Some nice ice cream
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