Koknese Castle Ruins

Koknese, Latvia

Before the arrival of the Teutonic Knights, Koknese was the site of a wooden hill fort inhabited by the Balts. In 1209 Bishop Albert of Riga ordered the construction of a stone castle at the site, naming it Kokenhusen. For the first 50 years of its existence, Koknese was solely used as a defensive fort, but by 1277, Koknese had enough population to receive city rights. Koknese also became a member of the Hanseatic League thanks to its strategic location on the Daugava trade route.

The castle was heavily contested between Polish, Swedish and Russian forces in the 16th and 17th centuries. It changed hands many times, while the native inhabitants endured periodic slaughter, capture, and famine. In 1701, during the Great Northern War, Koknese was finally blown up by retreating forces to avoid the strategic castle falling into advancing Russian hands. The castle was never rebuilt and fell to ruin.

In 1900, a park was established around the castle ruins, and Koknese became a popular summer resort. The area was known for its scenic waterfalls, cliffs, and look-outs. In 1965, the Soviet government built Pļaviņas Hydro Power Plant in the town of Aizkraukle. The reservoir flooded the entire length of the Daugava to Pļaviņas. Koknese Castle, once sitting atop a high bluff, was placed at the river's edge, while the scenic Daugava valley was submerged.

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Details

Founded: 1209
Category: Ruins in Latvia
Historical period: State of the Teutonic Order (Latvia)

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4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Faustas Vaičiulis (2 years ago)
Was very interesting!!!
Wera Fallmann (2 years ago)
This is the place where Daugava meets old castle ruins, so full of romance and history. You'll get the best view with sunny weather. There is also a walkway by the river to the Likteņdārzs.
Edmunds Kamolins (2 years ago)
Nice View.
Pavels Ruhmans (3 years ago)
Very interesting place to have a walk. Very marvelous in Autumn time. You can even go for a trip by ancient boat.
Dāvids Brics (3 years ago)
Beautiful ruins at riverside of Daugava. There is nice view at evenings. WC is available there too. Not easy to access for people in wheelchairs. Big parking lot near by, which is great plus for tourists visiting this site.
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