Vecpiebalga Castle

Vecpiebalga, Latvia

In its origins medieval Vecpiebalga Castle was regularly planned quadrangular building with household part and dwelling wing. Castle was damaged by fights in the 14th and 15th century. Old medieval castle became unuseful for inhibiting already in the 17th century. There were built several wooden household buildings at it. In the 18th century castle was completely gone to rack and ruin.

The new manor complex at its present place developed in the 2nd half of the 17th century. There was shaped united Classicism style architecture ensemble around the front yard at the beginning of the 19th century. In its origins entry into the complex was possible through two gates at the corners of the representation yard. The Granary and the Cowshed were built at the road opposite the manor-house. Other household buildings including water tower were situated symmetric at the side of the road. There were erected new entrance gates between the Granay and the Cowshed in the 2nd half of the 19th century.

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Address

P33, Vecpiebalga, Latvia
See all sites in Vecpiebalga

Details

Founded: 14th century
Category: Ruins in Latvia
Historical period: State of the Teutonic Order (Latvia)

Rating

3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Markus (7 months ago)
Interesting old ruin in a beautiful landscape. Unfortunately Not that much left.
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