Krustpils Castle

Jēkabpils, Latvia

Krustpils Castle (Kreutzburg) is one of the best preserved medieval castles in Latvia. The first written reference of the Krustpils dates from 1237, when the Archbishop of Riga built a castle named Kreutz. In 1359, the Livonian order took seven castles belonging to the Riga Archbishopric, being Krustpils among them. During the Livonian war in 1559 the castle was devastated.

When the Livonian state was dissolved, Krustpils became property of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth from 1561 to 1772, while the opposite Jēkabpils was part of the Duchy of Courland and Zemgale. The difference between the Latgalian language and the Selonian dialect of the inhabitants on either side of the Daugava River remains as of today. In 1585,Stephen Báthory of Poland granted a large area which included Krustpils to general Nikolai von Korff, whose family owned the castle until the Latvian agrarian reforms of 1920 came into effect. As Krustpils castle became a residence of landlords, it gradually lost its medieval character.

In the 18th century the castle got a representative look when Baroque elements were added to exterior of the castle. At the time of the Russo-Turkish War from 1877 to 1878, there was a camp for Turkish prisoners of war, many of whom settled here permanently.
Krustpils castle together with other buildings of this complex was transferred to the Latvian army after 1920 and the Latgale artillery regiment was located there. During the Second World War infirmary of the German army was located there. The Military hospital of the Red Army was placed to Krustpils after August 1944.

During the Soviet times regiments of Soviet army were located in the castle such as the 16th regiment of long-range intelligence aviation and main storehouses of the 15th air regiment. For 50 years the premises were not managed and were close to be considered as ruins. After 1991 there has been ongoing active investigation and renewal of the castle.

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Details

Founded: 1255-1297
Category: Castles and fortifications in Latvia
Historical period: State of the Teutonic Order (Latvia)

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4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Zane Grava (20 months ago)
Atmosfēra mājīga. Telpas sāk remontēt,būs vēl feināk. Gidi patīkami un piedāvāto radošo darbnīcu klāsts arī patīkams. Iesaku "Siera stāstu"
Jolanta Liepiņa (2 years ago)
Ļoti patika! Diemžēl remontdarbu dēļ liela daļa ekspzīcijas bija slēgta. Ļoti patika tautas tērpu un simtgadei veltītās izstādes. Mazliet baisi bija pagrabā pie Brūnās dāmas.
Роман Реймер (2 years ago)
Один из последних замков Латгалии, который остался целый не разрушенный. Здесь вы найдёте старинные камины разную утварь и подвал. У замка есть своя легенда, живёт там приведение но доброе которое не пугает. Можно приобрести сувениры и нанять гида.
Gvido Saulìtis (2 years ago)
Vèsturiska skaista vieta.Tagad iet restauràcijas darbi..
Dmitrijs Barkovskis (2 years ago)
Good
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