Cesvaine Palace

Cesvaine, Latvia

Cesvaine Palace was built in 1896 for the German baron Emil von Wulf (not to be confused with the von Wolf baronial family). Authors of the project were architects Hans Grisebach and August Dinklage from Berlin. The palace is built in the late Tudor Neo-Renaissance style. It is located next to the old medieval castle ruins, remains from the old bishops castle.

At the end of the 19th century, Germany abandoned the reproduction of old German prototypes and turned to England in search of inspiration, namely to late Tudor-style architecture. The style had preserved certain Gothic elements. Picturesque frames, towers and turrets of different forms and sizes, high decorative chimneys and steep roofs were all characteristic features of the style.

Cesvaine Palace is an impressive construction representing this trend in Latvia. Abandoning forms of the German renaissance, Griesebach created an unusual, noble and welcoming construction. It is a romantic and picturesque building, and its architecture harmonizes with the landscape. The palace is built of stone, skilfully using the colour and texture of the material. The building is renowned not only for its size and frame, but also for the quality of construction. The facades of the palace is made in the medieval style, so the palace leaves the impression of a medieval fortification.

The palace has survived all revolutions and wars of the twentieth century, so interiors were almost in perfect condition. Unfortunately in 2002 the palace suffered heavily in a fire. All of the roof and second floor was destroyed and the first floor was seriously damaged. But, many interior elements survived and will be restored. Although restoration works has started, due to the lack of finances they are proceeding very slowly. The last few decades there was a local secondary school housed in the palace.

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Address

Pils iela 1, Cesvaine, Latvia
See all sites in Cesvaine

Details

Founded: 1896
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Latvia
Historical period: Part of the Russian Empire (Latvia)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Gita Memmena (3 years ago)
Palace was closed for reconstructon, but we explore surrounding and Cesvaine is very photogenic town. Also Green house is very special place - with its story and beauty.
Oksana Demenchenko (3 years ago)
Beautiful castle. Very elegant. In a quiet area. Unfortunately on a renovation at the moment.
Vidvuds Karlis Sulcs (3 years ago)
One of the most beautiful castles in Latvia!
Antanas Taparauskas (3 years ago)
Left a deep impression. Amazing
Ainars Dominiks (3 years ago)
it is very sad that this Castle, Palace is still not ready. 15 years passed since it burned down and now is still in such bad condition. Very sad about our government who doesn't want to spend money in suck great architecture. Shame on them. Still good place to visit and take photos.
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