Krimulda Castle Ruins

Sigulda, Latvia

The Krimulda Castle dates from the 14th century and was destroyed in a war in 1601. During the 13th century the left bank of the Gauja river was governed by the Order of the Brethren of the Sword, (later known as the Order of Livonia), while the territories on the right bank were under the domain of the Archbishop of Riga. Krimulda castle belonged to the Riga High Council which was a group of twelve high priests who advised the archbishop.

Krimulda castle was built on the edge of a high bank on the right side of Gauja near the Vikmeste castle mound and the village of Livs. This placement made it nearly impossible to conquer. On one side it was protected by the steep valley wall of Gauja river, two additional sides were obstructed by the Vikmeste river, which had equally steep banks, and the fourth side bordered on a man-made ravine with a draw-bridge leading into the forecastle. The deep valley of the Vikmeste River also provided a natural borderline between the lands of Krimulda and Turaida. The castle was built using large-sized boulders. The outer wall of the castle at ground level was about 2 meters thick.

The castle was involved in a number of battles between the Livonian Order and the Archbishop of Riga as well as many of the later wars of Livonia. In the spring of 1601 during the Swedish-Polish war, it was conquered by the Swedish army. In the fall of that same year advancing Polish troops burned the castle down so it would not fall into the hands of the enemy. The castle was left unrepaired after the fire.

The castle regained purpose in the mid-19th century under the ownership of Prince Liven. Not as a military fortification but as a romantic addition to a park. From here you will find a beautiful overlook point, named 'Bellevue', where you can enjoy the numerous picturesque bends of the Gauja River.

Prince Liven’s living house was built in the classic style. The manor complex consists of steward’s house, coach house, Swiss cottage, etc. Home wine tasting is available by prior arrangement.

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Details

Founded: ca. 1255
Category: Ruins in Latvia
Historical period: State of the Teutonic Order (Latvia)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Юлия Попова (16 months ago)
Руины замка Кримулда. Там совсем развал, одна арочка и никуда камней. Но парк вокруг живописный, особенно вокруг поместья, в котором реабилитационный центр и хостел. Рядом Канатка в центр Сигулды
Lelde Vaza (2 years ago)
Love this place
Helmuts Vindbergs (2 years ago)
Just a simple ruin.
Roberto de Fano (2 years ago)
All the Gauja natural reserve is beautiful. If you are planning a trip to Latvia don't miss this place.
Doron Shalom (2 years ago)
טירה בלב שמורה. ניתן להגיע ברכבל. יפה מאוד. ליד יש בית קפה מקסים עם מרק עגבניות טעים!!!
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