Stameriena Palace

Stāmeriena, Latvia

Stāmeriena Palace is a palace built between 1835 to 1843 by Johann Gottlieb von Wolff and subsequently his descendents. In 1905, during the Russian Revolution, the manor was burned down, but was later renewed by Baron Boris von Wolff in 1908. Although it was rebuilt in different style it is considered one of the brightest architectural achievements of his time in French Neo-Renaissance style in Latvia. Stāmeriena palace was one of the few manors which were not nationalised after Latvian agrarian reforms in 1920s. So baron von Wolff family continued to live there through the 1930s until 1939. The palace was presented as a gift to Andrei Pilar von Pilchau. Sicilian writer Giuseppe Tomasi di Lampedusa lived in the Stāmeriena palace a few years. He married the palace's owner Alexandra von Wolff in 1932.

After the second world war a Technical school of agriculture was located in the palace. Later it was used as the administration building of the local state owned farm (sovkhoz). After the 1992 palace stood empty for six years. In 1998 it became a private property and since then the palace and landscape park around it are being restored and are open for visitors.

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Details

Founded: 1835-1843
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Latvia
Historical period: Part of the Russian Empire (Latvia)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ilze Miķelsone (10 months ago)
Nice
Ondřej Čermák (11 months ago)
Currently closed, but very nice even from the outside plus the park or is nice
Ainars Dominiks (16 months ago)
Very nice and beautiful castle. Unfortunately another one who is going to be lost for Latvia. It hasn't been renovated since my last visit approx 15 years ago. Very sad
Marija Shirokova (2 years ago)
Very interesting sightseeing place. They recently opened additional rooms for excursions. This palace will be renovated in the nearest future.
Margus Pala (2 years ago)
I visited the castle while seeing friend in Stameriena. Castle is very nice even though it needs some renovation. Until then it has very authentic feel. However I liked the most the girl who was working there and who was very warm and welcome. She was showing me around the castle and talked about the interesting history. I was very happy that I decided to go to the castle and I will definitely go again when I am nearby.
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