Dikļi Manor was the property of von Wolf family in the 19th century. Dikli Palace was built for Baron P. von Wolf in 1896. Covering forms of the central facade are repeating type-lines of mansard roofs' side risalites. That kind of treatment of German Beo-Broque style is not a copy of abroad masterpieces, but unique creation using international language of style and adapting it to the local culture enviroment. Mansard was rebuilt in continous years, so a bit of Baroque charm was wasted.

The buildings of the Dikļi castle are organically complemented by a park spanning 20 hectares. Adjacent to the palace lies a duck pond, which is said to have had a floor made of oak. Mazbriede River begins just beyond the pond, whose ravines contain a landscape garden, also known as the Forest Park. In the 1960s, after surveying Dikļi castle park, it was found that approximately 20 exotic trees grow on its grounds.

Dikļi castle is one of the few palaces and landed estates in Vidzemes where much of the original interior décor has been relatively well-preserved. The palace contains a collection of luxurious old stoves and fireplaces. Dikļi castle was restored in 2003. At the moment, the palace houses a hotel, a restaurant, a spa, a recreational facility with saunas, whirlpool bathtubs and a pool, and it provides a venue for various functions.

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Address

Dikļi, Kocēni, Latvia
See all sites in Kocēni

Details

Founded: 1896
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Latvia
Historical period: Part of the Russian Empire (Latvia)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Marko Ponder (3 years ago)
Super place, fantastic! Food is also excellent!
Carlos Guerlloy (3 years ago)
Wonderful, peaceful place Friendly staff. It worths the little higher prices.
Friedhelm Schwender (3 years ago)
Nice old Hotel in a marbeleous nature area
Rimantas SV (3 years ago)
Nice place with lot of authentic details and wifi :) Food was superb, time spend very well.
Anna Grohoļska (3 years ago)
I am giving 4 stars only because of the restaurant,really. 3 stars for hotel. Room: 2/5 stars Although we stayed here in off season (winter) the Princess room costs a fortune for what it is! And it is just outdated room with antique furniture. Ceilings are cracking, bathroom has either too hot or too cold water, uncomfortable old bed, noises from the water pipes... the list goes on. Even in 3 star hotels I have seen better. And interior is gloomy and dark, not my cup of tea. Dissapointment. Breakfast in bed: 3 /5 stars SPA: 2/5 stars (although they will be having a steam sauna and other updates, so that might raise the overall spa level) Restaurant: 4/5 stars In my opinion, restaurant is the best reason to visit Dikļi! A gem amongst restaurants around this area. Menu is local as it can get, interesting flavor combinations. Been here twice in autumn/winter and definitely planning to visit again in summer, when the restaurant is located in another room with a terrace.
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