Dubingiai Castle Ruins

Dubingiai, Lithuania

The first masonry castle in Dubingiai was constructed by Vytautas, Grand Duke of Lithuania, in 1412-1413 on an island, now apeninsula, in Lake Asveja in order to secure the capital Vilnius from attacks from Livonia. No accounts concerning the architecture of Vytautas' castle have survived. It was acquired by Jerzy Radziwiłł prior to 1508. He constructed a new palace in the Renaissance style in the first half of the 16th century. After the death of Jerzy, his son Mikolaj 'the Red' inherited the property, causing the town nearby to become an important hub for the Reformation in Lithuania. Barbara Radziwiłł spent five months in the castle after her marriage to Sigismund Augustus in 1547. The palace used to be one of the most luxurious residences in the Duchy, lagging not much behind the Royal Palace. Dubingiai Castle was the main seat of the Biržai-Dubingiai line of the Radziwiłł family until the second half of the 17th century, when it was transferred to Biržai Castle.

During the Polish–Swedish wars, the castle was pillaged by armies loyal to the King of Poland and was confiscated fromBogusław Radziwiłł. It returned to the family in the second half of the 17th century. The neglected castle and church gradually fell into ruins. It was sold to Michał Tyszkiewicz in 1808. Today only the foundations and several cellars of the castle and church remain and are being researched.

The masonry Calvinist Church of the Holy Spirit was built in the Renaissance style near the castle by Janusz Radziwiłłprior to 1620 and was intended to be the mausoleum of the Radziwiłł family. The most prominent members of the family were interred there, including Mikołaj 'the Black' Radziwiłł (1565) and his wife Elżbieta Szydłowiecka (1562), Mikołaj 'the Red' Radziwiłł (1584) and Janusz Radziwiłł (1620). Their remains were discovered during archaeologicalexcavations in 2004 and reburied there in 2009.

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Address

2812, Dubingiai, Lithuania
See all sites in Dubingiai

Details

Founded: 16th century
Category: Ruins in Lithuania

More Information

en.wikipedia.org
www.kpd.lt

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

JOvi Ein (3 years ago)
Wild nature track for walking, nice views. Needed to cut off grass and some trees. Possibilities to see ruins of castle during work week limited
Konsuela Juozapaviciene (3 years ago)
Good view. Interesting guide with interesting stories.
Mantas Sutkus (3 years ago)
Though it's just a hill now with a small museum, it's a must for anyone interested in history. Nice walk around
Egle Valeckaite (3 years ago)
You really need to be history fanatic to be interested in this place. At least the view is nice from the hill. Not impressed.
Labas Labas (3 years ago)
Interesting to find more about Lithuanian history, it's places and castles. Also there is a lovely town nearby with modern church, old bell tower and historical tavern.
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