St. John's Church

Vilnius, Lithuania

One of the most picturesque parts of the Vilnius University is the St. John's Church and its bell tower. The construction of the Gothic style church lasted for almost 40 years and was completed in 1426. In 1571 the church was transferred to the Order of Jesuits and became a part of the university complexes.

Besides masses, the Church of Sts. Johns has also witnessed student protests, theatre performances, and welcoming ceremonies for kings. In Soviet times, it was turned into a warehouse. Later, the University Museum was established there. Today St. John's is again a Roman Catholic church. It was visited by Pope John Paul II in 1993.

The bell tower of the church, which is 68 meters high, is among the highest buildings in the Old Town. The present facade was designed in the 18th century by the most prominent Vilnius Baroque architect, Jonas Kristupas Glaubicas (Johan Christoph Glaubitz).

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Founded: 1386-1426
Category: Religious sites in Lithuania

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Laimis Jodkonis (12 months ago)
Fantastic view outside. It is possible to see a big part of the city. A bit difficult to climb the last steps to the tower top but the view is worth it. The view inside is interesting too. Maybe just price could be less.
Harry Jack UK (12 months ago)
Definitely one of the most beautiful churches I've seen in Europe
Val Sem (13 months ago)
If you need a Mercedes (or 2) ?
Vincenzo Palma (2 years ago)
Very beautiful, in the yard of university
Vincenzo Palma (2 years ago)
Very beautiful, in the yard of university
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