Senieji Trakai Castle

Senieji Trakai, Lithuania

The first enclosure-type brick castle in Senieji Trakai was built by Grand Duke Gediminas, who transferred the capital of Lithuania from Kernavė to Trakai (today's Senieji Trakai) before 1321. The wedding of Grand Duke Kęstutis and Birutė was held there and it was the birthplace of the Grand Duke Vytautas in 1350.

The castle in Senieji Trakai was destroyed by the Teutonic Order in 1391, subsequently abandoned and never rebuilt as a new castle had been erected in Trakai by Kęstutis. The ruins of the castle were granted to Benedictian monks by Vytautas in 1405. It is presumed that the present monastery building, dating from the 15th century, holds the remains of Gediminas castle.

Archaeological research on the hillfort mound was carried out in 1996–1997. The findings confirmed the existence of a former rectangular masonry castle wall, which had surrounded the hill. It is supposed that the residential buildings had occupied the area near the church and the churchyard.

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Details

Founded: before 1321
Category: Castles and fortifications in Lithuania

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4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Arturas Rusinovas (7 months ago)
Daug vienuoliu
TheRin30 (7 months ago)
В настоящее время от замка осталось лишь городище. В 1321 году великий князь литовский Гедимин устроил недалеко от новой столицы Вильнюса одну из своих новых резиденций и построил в ней кирпичный замок (нынешний Старый Тракай). В 1337 году он стал главным городом созданного княжества. Сын Гедимина Кестут построил себе новый замок в нынешнем Тракае на озере. В Старом Тракае родился великий князь литовский Витовт. Замок в Старом Тракае был разрушен Тевтонским Орденом в 1391 году. В 1405 году руины замка были подарены Витовтом бенедиктинским монахам, которые основали здесь монастырь. Предполагается, что нынешнее здание монастыря, датируемое XV веком, включает в себя остатки замка Гедимина.Центральная часть Старого Тракая вместе с монастырём провозглашена архитектурным заповедником.
A Z (14 months ago)
worth a visit for sure. Quite carefully restored castle on the island, surrounded by picturesque lakes. Inside the castle there is an interesting museum. At souvenir stalls prices are often higher than in Vilnius
Egidijus Bartkus (3 years ago)
By far the nicest castle in Lithuania
Adomas Rutkauskas (3 years ago)
Lithuanian classics :) If you come to Lithuania for longer than two or three days, you MUST visit at least two castles - Gediminas (the Upper) castle in Vilnius and Castle of Trakai :)
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