Senieji Trakai Castle

Senieji Trakai, Lithuania

The first enclosure-type brick castle in Senieji Trakai was built by Grand Duke Gediminas, who transferred the capital of Lithuania from Kernavė to Trakai (today's Senieji Trakai) before 1321. The wedding of Grand Duke Kęstutis and Birutė was held there and it was the birthplace of the Grand Duke Vytautas in 1350.

The castle in Senieji Trakai was destroyed by the Teutonic Order in 1391, subsequently abandoned and never rebuilt as a new castle had been erected in Trakai by Kęstutis. The ruins of the castle were granted to Benedictian monks by Vytautas in 1405. It is presumed that the present monastery building, dating from the 15th century, holds the remains of Gediminas castle.

Archaeological research on the hillfort mound was carried out in 1996–1997. The findings confirmed the existence of a former rectangular masonry castle wall, which had surrounded the hill. It is supposed that the residential buildings had occupied the area near the church and the churchyard.

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Details

Founded: before 1321
Category: Castles and fortifications in Lithuania

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4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Arnold Zinkevič (15 months ago)
Nice historical place always stoping there on my bike rides
Karolis Pikelis (4 years ago)
Was expecting something more, it's just a church
Jolita M (4 years ago)
I really recommend to visit this place
Peter Graham (5 years ago)
Senieji Trakai Castle was a castle in Senieji Trakai, Lithuania. The first enclosure-type brick castle was built by Grand Duke Gediminas, who transferred the capital of Lithuania from Kernavė to Trakai before 1321.
Edit W (5 years ago)
A little bit far away from bus station
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