At the end of the 14th century, Teutonic Knights built a castle in Ryn, serving as a base for fighting with the Lithuanians. Until 1525, the castle was the seat of the commander. After two years of the construction of the castle, then the Grand Master of the Order Winrich von Kniprode arrived in Ryn to inspect and take over the castle, and returned to the Malbork by waterway. In 1723 Ryn received city rights granted by the Prussian King Frederick William I and in 1853 the castle was converted into a prison. Since July 2006, the castle operates as a hotel.

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Address

Plac Wolności 2, Ryn, Poland
See all sites in Ryn

Details

Founded: 14th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Poland

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

DC5_ Lobo (2 years ago)
This place was amazing. I attended a holiday banquet here and it was great. There was a live band great food and nice staff. In this castle theres a hotel, indoor pool, underground club and bar, a restaurant, and a souvenir shop.
Adam (2 years ago)
Very nice food at the restaurant.
Marko Pylypec (2 years ago)
This castle is a truly wonderful place. It is a museum as well as a hotel. I was lucky enough to get a private tour of the castle and it is astonishing. They show you the different weapons and devices they had in the 11th century and has a great design over all. They have a magnificent pool in the underground segment of the castle that has a wonderful design. The only problem I find with this wonderful castle is that the hotel price is much to high. This place is glorious but the price makes me think, is it really worth it?
Richard Jonsson (2 years ago)
Very nice and interesting Castle (and Hotell) Highly recommended stay!
Yan Song (2 years ago)
It is a peace castle both side around the lake , near this castle ,you also can find some restraints and small shop to get some convince things which you need .it is value to drive 4 hours from Gdynia to here
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