Ketrzyn Castle

Ketrzyn, Poland

The town of Kętrzyn (until 1946 Rastenburg) was founded by the Teutonic Knights at the Prussian settlement called Rast. Initially there was a wooden watchtower, around which developed a settlement. In 1357 the commander of Bałga Johann Schindekopf granted the settlement civic rights. Shortly thereafter, in the city began construction of the defensive church dedicated to St. George, castle and defense walls.

The Kętrzyn castle was raised in the second half of the 14th century in the south-west corner of the urban battlements. Castle contained a chapel, bakery, kitchen, mill, malt house, brewery, the meat store, grain silos, storage, armory and a powder magazine. The most representative northern wing was occupied by pfleger - prosecutor, official position of the Teutonic Order. After the year of 1525 the castle became the county seat of the Duke of Prussia. In 1910 the castle was taken over by the municipal authorities, Until World War II there was a finance office and housing for authority officials. Initially it had a triangular winged structure, closed on the west side wall with a gate. Numerous of reconstructions over the centuries, adapting the object to perform administrative functions and residential buildings changed the face of the object. In January 1945, the castle was burnt down. During the reconstruction of the castle was restored in the years 1962-1966 the Gothic character of the building. Currently in the Kętrzyn's castle are functioning: the public library and museum by the name of Wojciech Kętrzyński, and as well as with the interesting regional collections.

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Details

Founded: 14th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Poland

More Information

www.zamkigotyckie.org.pl

Rating

4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Michał G (7 months ago)
Extra
Darius Joksas (12 months ago)
It's closed for restoration at the moment.
Andrew Martin (2 years ago)
Great Historical Castle
yulia Ko (2 years ago)
It'sa great building with the huge history behind. It's a pleasure to walk around. Unfortunately the museum has very limited collection with written explanation on holish only - not very useful for international tourists.
Edwin Walther (2 years ago)
Cool place but unfortunately again one sees evidence of the avoidance of any German history of the place. Polish authorities attempting to convince people that it was always Poland and not Prussia. Shame.
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