Ostróda Castle

Ostróda, Poland

The first earth and timber fort was raised in Ostróda (Osterode) by the Teutonic knights in the mid-13th century. It stood in the fork between the Drwęca river branches, replacing an earlier Prussian stronghold. Construction of a brick castle built on a stone foundation was started by the Ostróda Commander (Hauskomtur) around 1349. The old earth and timber fortress together with the unfinished brick castle were hit by a fire during a Lithuanian raid commanded by duke Kiejstut in 1381. Soon afterwards a new brick castle was built.

The convent castle was constructed on a square plan, 44.7 x 45.2 m externally. Originally it had four wings with an archway in the west wing. Recently, the castle has been restored in the shape it had after the fire in 1788. Three wings (south, wet and north) have been preserved, although they lack the topmost storey, which was used for defense and storage. Some researchers claim that the castle had a tower in the south-east corner. To the north, there was a sanitary tower, most probably connected with the north wing of the castle by a wooden walk. During the archaeological excavations at the castle, the bases of pillars were unearthed, which may have supported the wooden gallery leading to the sanitary tower. The south wing contained a chapel, the commander's quarters and a refectory. The remaining wings most probably held the chapter room, infirmary and dormitories for brother knights and guests. The communication within the castle was through wooden walks parallel to the internal sides of the walls. Rooms on the ground floor in the north and south wings have preserved original cross and ribbed vaults on arches supported by granite pillars (partly reconstructed), while the cellars underneath are topped with cross vaults on diagonal arches. After the battle of Tannenberg, for two months Ostróda castle remained in the hands of Duke of Masovia, Janusz Mazowicki, who received the castle from the Polish King Władysław Jagiełło. In September 1410 the castle returned to the Teutonic Knights. In 1629 the Swedish King, Gustav Adolph resided at Ostróda castle. For six years, from 1633 to 1639, the castle was ruled by the Silesian Duke of Legnica and Brzeg, John Christian.

In the great fire of Ostróda in 1788, the flames reached the castle, where large quantities of gunpowder were stored in the east wing at that time. Soon a gigantic explosion damaged the east wing and the castle roofs. Although the castle was rebuilt, it did not regain its previous shape - the east wing was not reconstructed and the whole castle was one storey lower. In the 19th century the walls were plastered and many extensions were added to the castle building. From 21st February to 1st April 1807 the castle hosted the French emperor, Napoleon Bonaparte. He arrived here to rest after the exhausting battle at Prussian Eylau, which was victorious for the French party but caused much bloodshed. A rather unexpected outcome of that brief stay at Ostróda castle was a number of arts objects documenting the event. The Ostróda Museum exhibits a replica of the painting by the French artist Marie Nicolas Ponce-Camus 'Napoleon promises his grace to Ostróda burgers. March 1807'; the original canvas hangs in the historic gallery at Versailles. Another exhibit at Ostróda Castle which commemorates Napoleon I is a silver medal 'Napoleon a Osterode', made by the French graver Bertrand Andrieu. In the 19th century the castle was a seat for the local administration office and court of justice. There were also several apartments for officials. In 1945 the castle was burnt by the Soviet Army and remained in the state of preserved ruin for nearly thirty years. The reconstruction of the castle was commenced in 1974 and continued until the 1990s. At present, the castle houses the Museum of Ostróda, the Centre of Culture, a gallery and a library.

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Founded: 1349-1370
Category: Castles and fortifications in Poland

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Artur Ciegotura (14 months ago)
Compared to other castles this one offers a limited access to the building. There is a nice little museum, a contemporary art exhibit, a sourvenir store and a really nice library on a first floor. Napoleon briefly stayed at the castle. Other parts of the castle are closed to the tourists, not sure why.
Dariusz Gruszka (14 months ago)
Good ?
Krystian Brazulewicz (2 years ago)
Renovated castle. Not very impressive.
Virginija G (3 years ago)
We were late and can't go inside. From outside - nothing special. The park and children playground on the other street side is more attractive for are short stop.
Michał Kamil Wudarski (緑のライオン) (3 years ago)
Really nicely preserved teutonic red brick castle. Entrance to the courtyard is free. It's actually quite small but houses a nice museum of regions history.
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