Habo Church (Habo kyrka) is a unique wooden church building which bears resemblance to a cathedral, but is built entirely in wood. It is in the form of abasilica, with a high nave and two lower side aisles. It received its present appearance in 1723.

The interior of the church was painted in 1741-1743 by two artists from Jönköping, Johan Kinnerius and Johan Christian Peterson. The paintings illustrate Martin Luther's catechism summary of Christian doctrine.

Habo Church is one of four churches whose pictures were reproduced by the Swedish Post Office in 2002 for a series of Christmas stamps under the rubric 'Romantic Churches at Christmas'.

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Habo Kyrkby, Habo, Sweden
See all sites in Habo

Details

Founded: 1723
Category: Religious sites in Sweden
Historical period: The Age of Liberty (Sweden)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Leif K-son (9 months ago)
Very nice paintings inside church!
Laura N (9 months ago)
Nice church worth a visit
Egil Töllner (10 months ago)
A beautiful wooden cathedral well worth the visit.
Mi. Beckers (10 months ago)
Fascinating old wooden church that is completely painted. Very much detailed sceneries are shown on the walls and ceiling. really worth to make a trip out there.
Marija Rusaka (2 years ago)
Absolutely amazing old wooden church with stunning beautiful interior covered with old painted masterpieces !!! Highly recommended for all!
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