Brahehus Castle Ruins

Gränna, Sweden

Brahehus Castle was built by Per Brahe between 1637 and 1650s. Soon after Per Brahe died in 1680 Brahehus was abandoned and moved as a Crown property in the Great Reduction under Charles XI of Sweden. In 1708 the castle was destroyed by fire and not rebuilt anymore. From the ruins you have a fantastic view of lakes Vättern and Visingsö.

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Address

Brahehus 1, Gränna, Sweden
See all sites in Gränna

Details

Founded: 1637-1650
Category: Ruins in Sweden
Historical period: Swedish Empire (Sweden)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Annette RK Madej (12 months ago)
Nice stop on way back to Stockholm. Great views and candy cane.
Alice Mwimbi (2 years ago)
Beautiful restaurant and very clean. The service is excellent! Friendly Staff!! Happy Holidays to you All!!
Peter Bebawy (2 years ago)
A place to visit when you are doing a cross country trip. A unique and interesting place to see. We stopped for lunch to the restaurant next to the ruin and walked around it for a couple minutes, there isn’t much to see but if you want to take some nice pictures and get a view over the landscape and water. You can visit the ruin whenever during the day but recommend that you see it during the day, due to how high up it is.
Evan Bryant (2 years ago)
Interesting ruin that was built as a sort of party castle, refurbished for his widow and ended up a shelter for messengers a couple of years later when she died. An example of misuse of taxpayers money during the 1600s and proof that it isn't a new phenomena. Probably the best view over Vättern this side of the lake.
Anneli Rosvall (2 years ago)
We just stopped to grab our picnic and to take a stroll through the landmark (an old preserved royal ruin). There could have been a better way to mark the access of that landmark for persons with a disablement. Good accessibility if you put you eye and effort into it and fresh areas.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Augustusburg Palace

Augustusburg Palace represents one of the first examples of Rococo creations in Germany. For the Cologne elector and archbishop Clemens August of the House of Wittelsbach it was the favourite residence. In 1725 the Westphalian architect Johann Conrad Schlaun was commissioned by Clemens August to begin the construction of the palace on the ruins of a medieval moated castle.

In 1728, the Bavarian court architect François de Cuvilliés took over and made the palace into one of the most glorious residences of its time. Until its completion in 1768, numerous outstanding artists of European renown contributed to its beauty. A prime example of the calibre of artists employed here is Balthasar Neumann, who created the design for the magnificent staircase, an enchanting creation full of dynamism and elegance. The magical interplay of architecture, sculpture, painting and garden design made the Brühl Palaces a masterpiece of German Rococo.

UNESCO honoured history and present of the Rococo Palaces by inscribing Augustusburg Palace – together with Falkenlust Palace and their extensive gardens – on the World Heritage List in 1984. From 1949 onwards, Augustusburg Palace was used for representative purposes by the German Federal President and the Federal Government for many decades.

In 1728, Dominique Girard designed the palace gardens according to French models. Owing to constant renovation and care, it is today one of the most authentic examples of 18th century garden design in Europe. Next to the Baroque gardens, Peter Joseph Lenné redesigned the forested areas based on English landscaping models. Today it is a wonderful place to have a walk.