Brahehus Castle Ruins

Gränna, Sweden

Brahehus Castle was built by Per Brahe between 1637 and 1650s. Soon after Per Brahe died in 1680 Brahehus was abandoned and moved as a Crown property in the Great Reduction under Charles XI of Sweden. In 1708 the castle was destroyed by fire and not rebuilt anymore. From the ruins you have a fantastic view of lakes Vättern and Visingsö.

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Address

Brahehus 1, Gränna, Sweden
See all sites in Gränna

Details

Founded: 1637-1650
Category: Ruins in Sweden
Historical period: Swedish Empire (Sweden)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Annette RK Madej (41 days ago)
Nice stop on way back to Stockholm. Great views and candy cane.
Alice Mwimbi (2 months ago)
Beautiful restaurant and very clean. The service is excellent! Friendly Staff!! Happy Holidays to you All!!
Peter Bebawy (3 months ago)
A place to visit when you are doing a cross country trip. A unique and interesting place to see. We stopped for lunch to the restaurant next to the ruin and walked around it for a couple minutes, there isn’t much to see but if you want to take some nice pictures and get a view over the landscape and water. You can visit the ruin whenever during the day but recommend that you see it during the day, due to how high up it is.
Evan Bryant (6 months ago)
Interesting ruin that was built as a sort of party castle, refurbished for his widow and ended up a shelter for messengers a couple of years later when she died. An example of misuse of taxpayers money during the 1600s and proof that it isn't a new phenomena. Probably the best view over Vättern this side of the lake.
Anneli Rosvall (7 months ago)
We just stopped to grab our picnic and to take a stroll through the landmark (an old preserved royal ruin). There could have been a better way to mark the access of that landmark for persons with a disablement. Good accessibility if you put you eye and effort into it and fresh areas.
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