Admiralty Church

Karlskrona, Sweden

The Admiralty Church (Amiralitetskyrkan), also known as the Ulrica Pia, was inaugurated in 1685. It is made entirely of wood, making it Sweden's largest wooden church. Originally it could seat 4,000.

The interior is in a light bluish color while the exterior is in the traditional Falu red. Its shape is a squarish greek cross, with each cross arm measuring 20 metres. In front of the main entrance stands the wooden figure of Rosenbom. The church is part of the UNESCO World Heritage Site Karlskrona naval base since 1998.

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Details

Founded: 1685
Category: Religious sites in Sweden
Historical period: Swedish Empire (Sweden)

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Anki Ericsson (3 months ago)
Mycket fint. Rekommenderas
Stefan Bresgen (4 months ago)
The touch of history and defence is something really special.
Jö M (10 months ago)
Open, wooden church worth a visit. There's also a little restroom outside the church.
Michał Antonik (2 years ago)
Great place,. Worth to see during sightseeing Karlskrona.
Andrea Cannizzo (3 years ago)
Nice church completely made by wooden.
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