Fredrikskyrkan (translation, 'Frederick's Church') construction began in 1720 as a replacement for the city's temporary wooden church, Hedvig Eleonora Church. The church was consecrated in 1744. Fredrikskyrkan was built in the baroque style after a design by Nicodemus Tessin the Younger. Though Crown Prince Adolf Frederick was present for the event, the building was named in honor of Frederick I. The spires atop the church towers were completed in 1758. There has been several restorations. The one in 1805-06 was led by architect Olof Tempelman. Interior restorations occurred in 1913-15 under Axel Lindegren, and there was another in 1967-68.

Fredrikskyrkan's towers are a notable feature. The carillon is housed in the south tower, and there are 35 bells, which were installed in 1967 by the Bergenholtz bell foundry in Sigtuna. The clock chimes three times a day.

The 1854 pulpit is in a neoclassical style by the design of architect Johan Adolf Hawerman; it predates the altar. The carved wood baptismal font was donated by the ship builder Gilbert Sheldon. The church silver is preserved in a massive safe.

The church's first organ came from Hedvig Eleonora Church. When a decision was made to purchase a larger and more suitable organ,Lars Wahlberg received the contract to build an organ with 29 stops, 2 manuals and a pedal. When it was finished in 1764, he had inserted the 34 voices that are driven by six large bellows. Wahlberg's organ was replaced in 1905 by one built by Åkerman & Lund Orgelbyggeri in Stockholm; it was reconstructed in 1982-87 by Grönlunds Orgelbyggeri.

Situated on Stortorget, the main square in the city centre, Fredrikskyrkan is included within the Karlskrona UNESCO World Heritage Site.

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Details

Founded: 1720-1744
Category: Religious sites in Sweden
Historical period: Swedish Empire (Sweden)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ulla Hannu (5 months ago)
En väldigt vacker kyrka. Restaureras med känsla och kärlek.
Jörgen Borgström (6 months ago)
Nyrenoverad kyrka i lite mordenare stil och ny teknik. Utanför pågår förbättringar av utemiljön.
Mudar SE (2 years ago)
Beautiful city and pretty nice tory!
Sebastian Sjöberg (3 years ago)
All right church. Like a bootlegger's Notre Dame
Andrea Cannizzo (3 years ago)
Nice church. Nothing of special inside.
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