Kristianopel Church

Kristianopel, Sweden

Kristianopel (originally founded as Christianople) was established by the Danish king Christian IV in 1603 as a fortress city and named after his newborn son - Christian, or Kristian, with Danish spelling. The Greek suffix '-opel' was given to give the town a cosmopolitan ring similar to Constantinople. Construction of the town was completed in 1606.

The first church was built in 1600, but burnt down only eleven years later by Swedish army. The current churc was built of stone between 1618-1624. The chandelier dates from the former Avaskär church. Tje pulpit dates from 1621 and altar 1624. There is also a royal chair of Christian IV (1635).

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Details

Founded: 1618-1624
Category: Religious sites in Sweden
Historical period: Swedish Empire (Sweden)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Gustav Palmqvist (2 years ago)
A nice church, bit out of the ordinary architectual
Gustav Palmqvist (2 years ago)
A nice church, bit out of the ordinary architectual
Wolfgang Peitsch (2 years ago)
Nice place in Sweden
Wolfgang Peitsch (2 years ago)
Nice place in Sweden
Eaststone Stockholm AB (3 years ago)
Beautiful church, fanastic location
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