Nowe is a small town beautifully situated on the high bank of the Vistula River. On the steep bank slope, at the turn of the 12th and 13th century stood a mighty fortress, which, along with castles in Stargard and Świecie used to monitor ship traffic on the Vistula. The importance of the castle in Nowe emphasized the fact that it was a residence of Castellan duke Świętopełek II.

According to the chronicles, during the conquest of Gdańsk Pomerania, Teutonic Knights destroyed the city of Gdańsk, Tczew and Nowe. At this time the castle of Nowe was officiated by the Castellan Duke, while the town itself was the private property of Piotr Święca. Then, the Teutonic Knights offered to repurchase the rights to Nowe and the whole district, For the price of 1,200 grzywien (medieval coins weighing less than 200 grams of silver) Piotr Święca sold the town, where he had ruled for 12 years.

After the year 1308, Nowe was destroyed and depopulated. Not until 1350 that the Grand Master of the Teutonic Order, Heindrich Düssemer von Arffenberg, gave the town a new location privilege. The construction of the castle in Nowe started probably about mid-14th century by the Teutonic Knights at the place of castellan fortress. It was one of the smallest Teutonic castles in Pomerania. As it consisted of a three storey residential building, perimeter wall combined to the town's fortified walls. Probably the castle's separate walls fenced off the city, more likely preceded by a moat. The lowest tier was allocated to utility rooms. The rooms on the first floor were occupied by the religious brother holding the custody of the castle,placed next to the dining hall, chapel and a guests room. The highest tier was allocated to the granaries and warehouses.

Nowe returned to Poland in 1466. The 16th century was a time of prosperity for the town, which profited from its location on a commercial trail along the Vistula river. Settled here were Dutch Mennonites, who fled to Poland from religious persecution. During the 17th century Swedish wars the town was badly destroyed and deserted.

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Address

plac Zamkowy 1, Nowe, Poland
See all sites in Nowe

Details

Founded: c. 1350
Category: Castles and fortifications in Poland

More Information

www.zamkigotyckie.org.pl

Rating

4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

PaweĊ‚ Winiecki (15 months ago)
The building itself doesn't look particularly special. We didn't manage to get inside - explore / find out more.
Marcin Sykutera (15 months ago)
Unfortunately, it's hard for me to say anything about this place because I was on Sunday
Lilberai (16 months ago)
As the castle stands, it is private so you can only take a photo.
To bi (17 months ago)
At the moment, construction works are underway ... honestly, when someone passes by "by the way" it's ok ... but if someone like me, it can be very disappointed ... the only thing worth seeing is the market square, church, and a viewpoint on the Vistula ...
Marcin Owczarek (17 months ago)
Unfortunately, renovation, so now closed. The castle itself on the picturesque Vistula embankment.
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