The Assumption of Mary Church

Chełmno, Poland

The Assumption of Mary parish church is one of East Pomerania’s oldest and biggest churches. Built along the east-west axis, the construction work lasted from 1280 to 1320: a hall church consisting of three naves and two towers, each of a different height, emerged. In the 13th century the church opened a town school and a library. 1473 saw the opening of a 'studium particulare' (a secondary school), which later became known as the Chełmno Academy. The school was run by the Brethrens of Common Life from Zwolle, a town in the Netherlands. In 1519 the Chełmno bishop made the church a collegiate church. In 1649 the church became a sanctuary of Our Lady. Between 1676 and 1825 the church was run by missionary priests. The church’s interior is abundant in Gothic, Renaissance, Baroque and Rococo decorations.

To those belong, among the other things, colourful Gothic and Baroque paintings, 11 apostle figures, tombstone of Lambert Longus from 1319, Baroque and Rococo altars, organ and deer's head from the 17th century, many valuable epitaphs, two chapels as well as God's suffering mother of Chełmno (north) and Corpus Christi (south). The church also holds the precious relics of the patron of romantic love Saint Valentine.

The tower of the Assumption of Mary parish church is with its 60 meters the highest viewpoint of the town. Open from May 1st until September 30th.

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Founded: 1280
Category: Religious sites in Poland

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