Sarka - The Finnish Museum of Agriculture

Loimaa, Finland

Sarka brings the versatile history of farming to you through moving image, sound, scale models and genuine objects. As an introduction to its collections, the Museum has an impressive scale model, which takes you through the development of the imaginary village of Sarkajoki from the Bronze Age to present. The basic collection builds on farm work associated with each season. Another dimension of the exhibition is time. It covers two main periods: the time before the post-war mechanisation of farming and the period after that until 2004.

Reference: museot.fi

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Details

Founded: 2004
Category: Museums in Finland
Historical period: Independency (Finland)

More Information

www.sarka.fi
www.museot.fi

Rating

3.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jaffa Toivanen (2 years ago)
Nice place. Great experience.
Roope Pellinen (2 years ago)
Very good food and happy staff.
Gabriel Kout (3 years ago)
Pretty worth it! This museum is interesting and learns you many things about Loimaa's way of life. The only problem is that much things are only on Finish (not everything of course but some interesting things), so I was happy to go there with a Finish friend!
Antanas Bernikas (4 years ago)
Great place to visit with kids that we just discovered. We have been exploring smaller towns of Finland and discovered this museum of agriculture in Finland in a small town of Loimaa in Finland. The place is actually great for kids, offers really many interaction possibilities, you can actually sit at a drivers seat of a harvester with a video projecting the field and your operating the vehicle. Also many other similar small activities that were absolutely enjoyed by our two sons (2 and 5 year old). Also there is an outdoor exhibition of some old farm buildings which is nice to explore when the weather is good. I strongly recommend to visit this place, with or without children. Also it has some great lunch buffet, homemade food quality, at normal buffet prices.
Nikola Goleš (4 years ago)
Very interesting museum and a great learning experience
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