Nuutajärvi Glass Factory

Urjala, Finland

The oldest factory of Nuutajärvi Glass was founded in 1793, and it is the oldest glass factory in Finland that is still in function. It was founded by the local manor owners, Jakob Wilhelm de Pont and Harald Furuhjelm who were granted to manufacture window glass and other glass products.

Johan Agapetus Törngren bought the manor and glass factory in 1843. His son Adolf Törngren extended Nuutajärvi production strongly in the 1850s and for example hired Belgian and French experts to increase the quality of glass. He also restructured the factory site and other buildings to a uniform ensemble.

Today Nuutajärvi factory site is still one of the most well-preserved industrial milieus in Finland representing the solid Neo-renaissance architecture style. The oldest buildings are the bell tower from the 18th century and the empire style manor house built in 1822. Worker huts have been built between 1860s and 1940s.

Nowadays the factory produces famous Finnish art glass. For instance, the birds of Oiva Toikka are made in Nuutajärvi. Nuutajärvi Glass Village is a popular tourist attraction with over 100 000 visitors yearly. It provides restaurant, conference and accomodation services. Guided tours are also available.

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Details

Founded: 1793
Category: Industrial sites in Finland
Historical period: The Age of Enlightenment (Finland)

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Chandru Actionvoip (2 years ago)
Didn't get chance to check the museum. But the coffee shop and little expo of glass product was good
Manu Kemppainen (2 years ago)
Iittala glass outlet and store together with Fiskars equipments - mainly kitchen and garden. Sometimes this place have nice findings - e.g. Aalto vases with good price. Not too often though.
A I (2 years ago)
A good get away from city busy life good for Sunday, this factory been running since 1793 , so in fact it is a piece of history. What a wonderful place and how different glass artisan put there efforts in making beautiful glad, ceramic and China clay items. Brilliant simply brilliant.
Mike Shepherdson (3 years ago)
Nice and quite different way of life
Ralph Capper (4 years ago)
If you like glass, this is interesting. Some *very* expensive items in here, makes a man nervous to walk around with a backpack on.
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