Nørre Vosborg Castle

Vemb, Denmark

Niels Bugge was one of the first known owners of the Nørre Vosborg manor in the 14th century. In 1532 a huge storm surge enveloped and demolished the buildings, which were not rebuilt on the same site. Knud Gyldenstjerne moved Nørre Vosborg inland to its present, safer position. The estate was subsequently owned by the Linde Leths (1707–1778) and the Tangs (1783-1946), the latter family hosting many prominent guests at their imposing manor. Among them, in the summer of 1859, was Hans Christian Andersen, who here found time to write poetry and tales, cut silhouettes, and generally amuse himself relating accounts of numerous resident ghosts.

The fascinating castle complex consists of buildings from four centuries, and represents five different architectural styles. Built in 1552, the Gyldenstjerne residence features characteristic Gothic garrets and has been remodelled several times. The Renaissance, half-timbered Ide Lange residence was built in 1642. With its supporting columns of joined wood, this is one of the earliest of its kind in this part of Denmark. The Baroque style, particularly evident in the prominent stairways, is represented by the De Linde residence, which was built in 1770 on the foundation of a former carriage house and barn. Under the house, there were once five or six cells to hold prisoners on their way to high court in the city of Viborg. The Tang residence was built in the New Classicist style in 1839, and connected to the Gyldenstjerne wing by a New Gothic bay room.

Following a fire, the south section of the barn complex was rebuilt in 1951. Having once provided shelter for cows, calves and pigs, it today houses a foyer and multi-purpose hall with seating for 300 persons, as well as a conference room and three hotel rooms. The north section was built in 1778. It played an important role in the bullock business in bygone days, and still retains its typical North Jutland characteristics with burned tiles, hipped thatched roofs and blue wooden doors. At one time a haymow, bullock barn and horse stalls, as well as the farm bailiff’s residence, the building now contains the hotel reception, gift shop, some hotel rooms, as well as exhibition and banquet venues.

The Gate Tower is synonymous with Nørre Vosborg, and one only needs to see it to understand why. Built in 1790 by Peder Tang when he owned the manor, it was inspired by Dutch architecture he had seen on a business trip abroad. Note that the face of the clock has only one hand.

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Address

Vembvej 35, Vemb, Denmark
See all sites in Vemb

Details

Founded: 1552
Category: Castles and fortifications in Denmark
Historical period: Early Modern Denmark (Denmark)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Clau DIU (3 years ago)
Nice location and good food!
Michael Hofmann (3 years ago)
Amazing hotel build around an old manor. Very quiet and relaxing. We stayed in the new annex building. Rooms there feature a modern, contemporary design. Breakfast is in a separate building and offers a good buffet selection. Dinner is served in the manor main building. Very tasty and prepared with local ingredients. Service in the restaurant was very friendly and personal. Prices are on the higher side. We really enjoyed our stay.
Peter Warholm (3 years ago)
Cool old estate buildings, now modern conference center.
Daniel Munkholm Møller (4 years ago)
I had a great stay at Nørre Vosborg! The place is surrounded by beautiful historical buildings and wonderful nature. The rooms are large with modern interior and in minimalistic Scandinavian design. I was also pleased with the service provided by the staff in both the restaurant and at the reception, which was kind and helpful. Lastly, the food served at dinner and breakfast was of high quality - a bit pricey but reasonable.
Betty JD (4 years ago)
We were driving around Denmark and wanted to find a nicer place to stay on our journeys so we drove a bit out of our way to stay here. The grounds and the facilities are absolutely beautiful here. There are many walking trails outside of the property as well as biking options, but strolling around the property grounds itself is very nice. The staff was all helpful and attentive in both the reception and the cafe. We only had a chance to eat at the cafe but our food was superb and they were very accommodating when we asked for something that was not on the menu. Many of the buildings have a wonderful historical charm on the outside but the facilities inside are clean, modern and updated. Even the new buildings they have built for lodging fit nicely into the layout and look of the property. I highly recommend this place as a destination. We were sad that we only had time to stay here for one night.
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