Gustaf Adolf Serlachius (1830-1901) and his nephew Gösta Serlachius (1876-1942) were industrialists and one of the paper mill business pioneers in Finland. Gösta Serlachius founded the Gösta Serlachius Art Foundation in 1933, which became soon one of the wealthiest art collectors in Scandinavia. In 1945 foundation opened the art museum in Mänttä where the paper mills founded by Serlachius still exist.

Serlachius Museum Gösta is a museum of fine arts. At Joenniemi Manor you can see the Serlachius collection, one of the most important private art collections in the Nordic countries. It contains classic works of Finnish art and old European paintings from the 15th century to the 1940s. In the courtyard you can find a cosy cabin designed by the architect W. G. Palmqvist. Autere Cabin, Gösta's atmospheric cafeteria and restaurant, is the former home of the Joenniemi Manor bailiff.

Near the Gösta Museum is another museum named after Gustav Serlachius. The basic exhibition of Serlachius museum Gustaf traces the course of life in industrialising Finland from 19th century to the the present day. The exhibition shows how a small village grew into the home town of a major forest industry combine and learn about the everyday lives and festivities of both its gentry and workers.

Reference: museot.fi, visittampere.fi

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Details

Founded: 1945
Category: Museums in Finland
Historical period: Independency (Finland)

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jukka Räikkönen (2 years ago)
Worth a visit
Ruixing Yang (2 years ago)
First floor gives the introduction of Mänttä histroy with Finnish or English audio guide. Second and third floor give some modern art exhibition.
Timo Laine (3 years ago)
Interesting expedition. Lots of information on local history and industry.
Juha Kaunisto (3 years ago)
Interesting collections, especially if you're interested in industrial revolution in Finland.
Evangelia Psalida (3 years ago)
An excellent shelter for artistic souls:)
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Arch of Constantine

The Arch of Constantine is situated between the Colosseum and the Palatine Hill. It was erected by the Roman Senate to commemorate Constantine I's victory over Maxentius at the Battle of Milvian Bridge in 312. Dedicated in 315, it is the largest Roman triumphal arch. The arch spans the Via triumphalis, the way taken by the emperors when they entered the city in triumph.

Though dedicated to Constantine, much of the decorative material incorporated earlier work from the time of the emperors Trajan (98-117), Hadrian (117-138) and Marcus Aurelius (161-180), and is thus a collage. The last of the existing triumphal arches in Rome, it is also the only one to make extensive use of spolia, reusing several major reliefs from 2nd century imperial monuments, which give a striking and famous stylistic contrast to the sculpture newly created for the arch.

The arch is 21 m high, 25.9 m wide and 7.4 m deep. Above the archways is placed the attic, composed of brickwork reveted (faced) with marble. A staircase within the arch is entered from a door at some height from the ground, on the west side, facing the Palatine Hill. The general design with a main part structured by detached columns and an attic with the main inscription above is modelled after the example of the Arch of Septimius Severus on the Roman Forum.