Gustaf Adolf Serlachius (1830-1901) and his nephew Gösta Serlachius (1876-1942) were industrialists and one of the paper mill business pioneers in Finland. Gösta Serlachius founded the Gösta Serlachius Art Foundation in 1933, which became soon one of the wealthiest art collectors in Scandinavia. In 1945 foundation opened the art museum in Mänttä where the paper mills founded by Serlachius still exist.

Serlachius Museum Gösta is a museum of fine arts. At Joenniemi Manor you can see the Serlachius collection, one of the most important private art collections in the Nordic countries. It contains classic works of Finnish art and old European paintings from the 15th century to the 1940s. In the courtyard you can find a cosy cabin designed by the architect W. G. Palmqvist. Autere Cabin, Gösta's atmospheric cafeteria and restaurant, is the former home of the Joenniemi Manor bailiff.

Near the Gösta Museum is another museum named after Gustav Serlachius. The basic exhibition of Serlachius museum Gustaf traces the course of life in industrialising Finland from 19th century to the the present day. The exhibition shows how a small village grew into the home town of a major forest industry combine and learn about the everyday lives and festivities of both its gentry and workers.

Reference: museot.fi, visittampere.fi

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Details

Founded: 1945
Category: Museums in Finland
Historical period: Independency (Finland)

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jukka Räikkönen (11 months ago)
Worth a visit
Ruixing Yang (15 months ago)
First floor gives the introduction of Mänttä histroy with Finnish or English audio guide. Second and third floor give some modern art exhibition.
Timo Laine (2 years ago)
Interesting expedition. Lots of information on local history and industry.
Juha Kaunisto (2 years ago)
Interesting collections, especially if you're interested in industrial revolution in Finland.
Evangelia Psalida (2 years ago)
An excellent shelter for artistic souls:)
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