Kalela is a former wilderness atelier of Akseli Gallen-Kallela (1865-1931), a Finnish painter who is best known for his illustrations of the Kalevala, the Finnish national epic. His work was considered very important for the Finnish national identity.

Kalela is one of the largest nineteenth-century log buildings in Finland whose structure remains intact. It is designed by Gallen-Kallela himself and was completed in 1895. Gallen-Kallela family lived in Kalela several times between 1895 and 1921. Akseli Gallen-Kallela painted there his most famous Kalevala-themed paintings and designed textiles, furnitures and frescoes to l'Exposition Universelle, The Paris World Expo in 1900.

Today Kalela is a museum with temporary art exhibitions. It’s open in summer season (closed in 2011).

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Details

Founded: 1895
Category: Museums in Finland
Historical period: Russian Grand Duchy (Finland)

More Information

www.kalela.net

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3.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Kari Manninen (3 years ago)
Ei ole ollut auki yleisölle kymmeneen vuoteen.
Ari Laukniemi (3 years ago)
Ei ole auki
jaanus uustalu (3 years ago)
francis boniphace (4 years ago)
Lothar Mallon (9 years ago)
Ehdottomasti vierailun arvoinen. Avautuu toivottavasti pian jälleen.
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