Olstrup Church

Errindlev, Denmark

Olstrup Church is a Romanesque church built around 1200. In the Middle Ages, the church was originally dedicated to St Lawrence. Built of red brick, the relatively small church first consisted of a Romanesque chancel and nave. It was later extended to the west in the Late Gothic period with a stepped gable. The chancel's cross-vaults and the round chancel arch may date from the church's original construction. The cross-vaults in the nave also seem to be older than the Gothic extension.

In 1936, Egmont Lind discovered frescos in the east vault of the nave which were dated to c. 1575. They present scenes of the Last Judgment. Christ is depicted sitting on a rainbow with his feet on the globe of the Earth, flanked by trumpet-playing angels and the 12 apostles. Some pre-Reformation features such as the lily and sword are included but there are no halos.

The carved pulpit from 1622 has figures of the apostles. The canopy is from c. 1675. On the north wall there is a figure of St Lawrence from c. 1300. There is a decorated font in Gotland limestone.

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Details

Founded: c. 1200
Category: Religious sites in Denmark
Historical period: The First Kingdom (Denmark)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Brith Bång (2 years ago)
E. Betty Hannen Kristensen (3 years ago)
A beautiful church
Jan Sognnes Rasmussen (6 years ago)
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