Cismar Abbey was a Benedictine monastery founded in 1238 by Count Adolf IV of Holstein as alternative accommodation for Benedictine monks from Lübeck. In the mid-15th century it was one of the six original members of the influential Bursfelde Congregation, a Benedictine reform movement. After three prosperous centuries, based largely on its possession of a relic of the blood of Christ and a healing spring dedicated to John the Baptist, which made it a centre of pilgrimage, it was dissolved in 1561 during the secularisation brought about by the Reformation. The monastic library is preserved in the Danish Royal Library in Copenhagen.

The abbey is famous for its carved altar, dating from early in the 14th century, still in place in the church. The other surviving buildings, after a wide variety of secular uses, now serve as a museum.

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Founded: 1238
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Hohenstaufen Dynasty (Germany)

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4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ben Hudson (9 months ago)
Peaceful outdoor location that’s great for lunch or cake & coffee
Sven Barth (2 years ago)
Ok
Golpar M (2 years ago)
They had a nice setting, also a very nice playground was there... we enjoyed the visit.
Iris Haller (3 years ago)
On top of the great site, best coffee place with it
John Doe (3 years ago)
Visit the "Klosterfest Cismar" A most remarkable market. Many artists and musicians .... yearly in 2nd weekend in August.
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