Cismar Abbey was a Benedictine monastery founded in 1238 by Count Adolf IV of Holstein as alternative accommodation for Benedictine monks from Lübeck. In the mid-15th century it was one of the six original members of the influential Bursfelde Congregation, a Benedictine reform movement. After three prosperous centuries, based largely on its possession of a relic of the blood of Christ and a healing spring dedicated to John the Baptist, which made it a centre of pilgrimage, it was dissolved in 1561 during the secularisation brought about by the Reformation. The monastic library is preserved in the Danish Royal Library in Copenhagen.

The abbey is famous for its carved altar, dating from early in the 14th century, still in place in the church. The other surviving buildings, after a wide variety of secular uses, now serve as a museum.

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Details

Founded: 1238
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Hohenstaufen Dynasty (Germany)

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Esfandiar Nader (6 months ago)
A wonderful former monastery with awesome art classes for the family
syafa haack (8 months ago)
It's ok.
David Gray (12 months ago)
Less interesting than expected.
Mads Bundgaard (2 years ago)
Not much to see really
Burkhard Haasch (3 years ago)
Not a , yes the Northern monastry. Here the monks went on christianising SCANDINAVIA. A Museum today
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