Château Gaillard

Les Andelys, France

Château Gaillard is a ruined medieval castle, located 90 m above the commune of Les Andelys overlooking the River Seine. The construction began in 1196 under the order of Richard the Lionheart, who was simultaneously King of England and feudal Duke of Normandy. The castle was expensive to build, but the majority of the work was done in an unusually short time. It took just two years, and at the same time the town of Petit Andely was constructed.

Château Gaillard has a complex and advanced design, and uses early principles of concentric fortification; it was also one of the earliest European castles to use machicolations. The castle consists of three enclosures separated by dry moats, with a keep in the inner enclosure.

Château Gaillard was captured in 1204 by the French king, Philip II, after a lengthy siege. In the mid-14th century, the castle was the residence of the exiled David II of Scotland. The castle changed hands several times in the Hundred Years' War, but in 1449 the French captured Château Gaillard from the English for the last time, and from then on it remained in French ownership.

Henry IV of France ordered the demolition of Château Gaillard in 1599; although it was in ruins at the time, it was felt to be a threat to the security of the local population. The castle ruins are listed as a monument historique by the French Ministry of Culture. The inner bailey is open to the public from March to November, and the outer baileys are open all year.

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Details

Founded: 1196
Category: Castles and fortifications in France
Historical period: Late Capetians (France)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Roman Geber (7 months ago)
Stunning place and a must visit for fans of the Journeyman Project game series :D I was not disappointed. Visit on a sunny day, the place is surreal when the weather is on your side.
Jerry R (7 months ago)
Loved it. Very interesting. Take time to hike to the hill that is overlooking the castle.
Marvin Hartog (10 months ago)
Amazing view. Must visit when nearby. Careful with the bumper of your car. Rough roads.
Ash Shirazy (15 months ago)
Wonderful place! The history behind it is more interesting.
Rada Cat (16 months ago)
Good deathmatch map, 4/5 stars
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